606 episodes

Leaders aren't born, they're made. This Monday show helps you discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations. Independently produced weekly since 2011, Dr. Dave Stachowiak brings perspective from a thriving, global leadership academy, plus more than 15 years of leadership at Dale Carnegie. Bestselling authors, expert researchers, deep conversation, and regular dialogue with listeners have attracted 30 million downloads and the #1 search result for management on Apple Podcasts. Activate your FREE membership to search the entire episode library by topic at CoachingforLeaders.com

Coaching for Leaders Dave Stachowiak

    • Business
    • 4.8 • 1.1K Ratings

Leaders aren't born, they're made. This Monday show helps you discover leadership wisdom through insightful conversations. Independently produced weekly since 2011, Dr. Dave Stachowiak brings perspective from a thriving, global leadership academy, plus more than 15 years of leadership at Dale Carnegie. Bestselling authors, expert researchers, deep conversation, and regular dialogue with listeners have attracted 30 million downloads and the #1 search result for management on Apple Podcasts. Activate your FREE membership to search the entire episode library by topic at CoachingforLeaders.com

    How to Quit Bad Stuff Faster, with Annie Duke

    How to Quit Bad Stuff Faster, with Annie Duke

    Annie Duke: Quit

    Annie Duke is an author, corporate speaker, and consultant in the decision-making space, as well as Special Partner focused on Decision Science at First Round Capital Partners, a seed stage venture fund. Her previous book, Thinking in Bets, is a national bestseller. As a former professional poker player, she has won more than $4 million in tournament poker. During her career, Annie won a World Series of Poker bracelet and is the only woman to have won the World Series of Poker Tournament of Champions and the NBC National Poker Heads-Up Championship. She retired from the game in 2012. Prior to becoming a professional poker player, she was awarded a National Science Foundation Fellowship to study Cognitive Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania.



    Annie is the co-founder of The Alliance for Decision Education, a non-profit whose mission is to improve lives by empowering students through decision skills education. She is a member of the National Board of After-School All-Stars and the Board of Directors of the Franklin Institute. She also serves on the board of the Renew Democracy Initiative. Annie is the author of Quit: The Power of Knowing When to Walk Away*.



    We’ve all heard the lie that, “Winners never quit and quitters never win.” In reality, one of the best practices to develop is how to recognize more quickly when you should quit something that’s not working. In this conversation, Annie and I discuss how to set kill criteria for yourself and frame goals in more helpful ways to know when quitting is the best answer.

    Key Points



    Kenny Rogers was right; professional poker players know that a big part of success is quitting approximately 75% of the time.

    “Quit while you’re ahead” is often poor advice since we tend to quit too early when good things are happening. On the contrary, we tend to quit too late when we’ve accumulated sunk cost.

    Determine kill criteria in advance when you’re not as likely to be swayed by the emotions of the moment. The best criteria contain both a state and a date.

    Find someone who loves you but doesn’t care about your feelings. Trust and permission are essential to open up these kinds of conversations.

    Effective goals include at least one “unless…”



    Resources Mentioned



    Quit: The Power of Knowing When to Walk Away* by Annie Duke



    Interview Notes

    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).

    Related Episodes



    How to Pivot Quickly, with Steve Blank (episode 476)

    The Way to Make Better Decisions, with Annie Duke (episode 499)

    How to Build Confidence, with Katy Milkman (episode 533)



    Discover More

    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    • 38 min
    The Way Into Better Conversations About Wealth, with Kristin Keffeler

    The Way Into Better Conversations About Wealth, with Kristin Keffeler

    Kristin Keffeler: The Myth of the Silver Spoon

    Kristin Keffeler is a thought leader and consultant at the forefront of a global shift in family wealth advising, known as Wealth 3.0. She guides affluent and enterprising families, the rising generation, and the professionals who support them in embracing the positive power of wealth, aligning their vision with their impact. As the founder of Illumination360, she specializes in human motivation and behavioral change, family dynamics, family governance, rising generation education and development, and intergenerational collaboration.



    She is the Dean of Positive Psychology for the Purposeful Planning Institute, sits on the Board of Advisors for the Bailey Program for Family Enterprise at the University of Denver, is a faculty member with the Ultra-High Net Worth Institute, a certified trainer with 21/64, a national nonprofit for advancing multigenerational philanthropy, and is the co-founder of Beneficiary Bootcamp. She is the author of The Myth of the Silver Spoon: Navigating Family Wealth & Creating an Impactful Life*.



    In this conversation, Kristin and I discuss a reality that’s true for almost every leader: whether we have wealth ourselves, almost all of us interact with wealthy people. We explore some of the myths of wealth to understand the psychological challenges that wealth often brings. Plus, we learn from what works (and doesn’t) for wealthy families so that we can have better conversations about wealth in our own families.

    Key Points



    While wealth brings resources, it also brings psychological challenges for many people with wealth.

    More money doesn't equal happiness. Small inheritances can increase happiness, but large ones do not.

    Many people with wealth find close relationships a bit of a struggle.

    While our perception may be that the most wealthy are selfish and greedy, more often individuals (especially next generations) tend to under-identify with family wealth.

    Ground decisions in values that align with a vision of thriving.

    There’s a huge difference in the next generation having a little bit of ownership in a financial event vs. not having any ownership.



    Resources Mentioned



    The Myth of the Silver Spoon: Navigating Family Wealth & Creating an Impactful Life* by Kristin Keffeler



    Interview Notes

    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).

    Related Episodes



    How to Reduce Drama With Kids, with Tina Payne Bryson (episode 310)

    Dumb Things Smart People Do With Money, with Jill Schlesinger (episode 396)

    The Way to Build Wealth, with Chris Hogan (episode 502)



    Discover More

    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    • 35 min
    How to Discover Self-Awareness Through Enneagram, with Ian Morgan Cron

    How to Discover Self-Awareness Through Enneagram, with Ian Morgan Cron

    Ian Morgan Cron: The Road Back to You

    Ian Morgan Cron is a bestselling author, speaker, trained psychotherapist, songwriter, and Episcopal priest, but he may be best known for popularizing the Enneagram. The Enneagram is a personality typing system identifying nine types of people and how they relate to one another and the world. His popular Enneagram book, The Road Back to You* gave fresh language and interest in this assessment.



    Ian enjoys sharing about the Enneagram with audiences of all sizes because of its power for igniting personal growth, and how it can enrich our personal and professional lives. His newest book The Story of You* helps people go a step further, using Enneagram wisdom to uncover and rewrite our own false narratives so we can live life more fully.



    In this conversation, Ian and I look at the core aspects of the Enneagram model and how it can help us understand ourselves better so we can also support others more effectively. We highlight the nine Enneagram types and their key traits and distinctions. Then, we discuss how the first steps leaders might take in order to start raising their own self-awareness.

    Key Points



    Too often we believe that how we see the world is “normal” instead of recognizing that there are many normal ways to see the world.

    Personality is like the rooms of our home. We have a favorite room but we still use all the other rooms when its appropriate.



    The 9 Enneagram Types



    The Perfectionist - Ethical, dedicated and reliable, they are motivated by a desire to live the right way, improve the world, and avoid fault and blame.

    The Helper - Warm, caring and giving, they are motivated by a need to be loved and needed, and to avoid acknowledging their own needs.

    The Performer (or Achiever) - Success-oriented, image-conscious and wired for productivity, they are motivated by a need to be (or appear to be) successful and to avoid failure.

    The Romantic (or Individualist) - Creative, sensitive and moody, they are motivated by a need to be understood, experience their oversized feelings and avoid being ordinary.

    The Investigator - Analytical, detached and private, they are motivated by a need to gain knowledge, conserve energy and avoid relying on others.

    The Loyalist - Committed, practical and witty, they are worst-case-scenario thinkers who are motivated by fear and the need for security.

    The Enthusiast - Fun, spontaneous and adventurous, they are motivated by a need to be happy, to plan stimulating experiences and to avoid pain.

    The Challenger - Commanding, intense and confrontational, they are motivated by a need to be strong and avoid feeling weak or vulnerable.

    The Peacemaker - Pleasant, laid back and accommodating, they are motivated by a need to keep the peace, merge with others and avoid conflict.



    Resources Mentioned



    The Road Back to You: An Enneagram Journey to Self-Discovery* by Ian Morgan Cron and Suzanne Stabile

    The Story of You: An Enneagram Journey to Becoming Your True Self* by Ian Morgan Cron

    Take the Integrative Enneagram iEQ9

    Typology Institute Enneagram courses



    Related Episodes



    Enhance Your Self-Awareness, with Daniel Goleman (episode 353)

    The Way to Be More Self-Aware, with Tasha Eurich (episode 442)

    Discover Who You Are, with Hortense le Gentil (episode 459)



    Discover More

    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    • 37 min
    How Remote Teams Build Belonging, with Gustavo Razzetti

    How Remote Teams Build Belonging, with Gustavo Razzetti

    Gustavo Razzetti: Remote Not Distant

    Gustavo Razzetti is the CEO and founder of Fearless Culture, a culture design consultancy that helps teams do the best work of their lives. For more than 20 years, he has helped leaders from Fortune 500s, startups, nonprofits, and everything in between. He is also the creator of the Culture Design Canvas, a framework used by thousands of teams and organizations across the world to map, assess, and design their culture.



    In addition to his consulting work, Gustavo regularly speaks with leaders and teams about culture change, teamwork, and hybrid workplaces. He is the author of four books on culture change. His most recent book is Remote Not Distant: Design a Company Culture That Will Help You Thrive in a Hybrid Workplace*.



    In this conversation, Gustavo and I explore the critical nature of trust for building belonging on hybrid and remote teams. We examine the principles of psychological safety and how this matters just as much in digital collaboration. Perhaps most importantly, we look at several tactics to open up trust that will help us pave the ways towards team belonging.

    Key Points



    Hybrid work environments have the potential to be the best of both words, but in some places it is now worse.

    Trust is between individuals. Psychological safety is about how safe we feel with a team.

    It’s helpful to think of building psychological safety like climbing a ladder. Ironically, the higher you go on the ladder, the safer you feel taking risks.

    Welcoming questions such as “What's your superpower?” and “What's your kryptonite?” can be useful starting points for building trust.

    Metaphors are often a powerful way to entire into more complex, emotional discussion without feeling unsafe.



    Resources Mentioned



    Remote Not Distant: Design a Company Culture That Will Help You Thrive in a Hybrid Workplace* by Gustavo Razzetti



    Interview Notes

    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).

    Related Episodes



    How to Create Team Guidelines, with Susan Gerke (episode 192)

    How to Build Psychological Safety, with Amy Edmondson (episode 404)

    How to Engage Remote Teams, with Tsedal Neeley (episode 537)



    Discover More

    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    • 37 min
    Where to Start When Inheriting a Team in Crisis, with Lynn Perry Wooten

    Where to Start When Inheriting a Team in Crisis, with Lynn Perry Wooten

    Lynn Perry Wooten: The Prepared Leader

    Lynn Perry Wooten is a seasoned academic and an expert on organizational development and transformation. She became the ninth president of Simmons University on July 1, 2020 and is the first African American to lead the university. Her research specializes in crisis leadership, diversity and inclusion, and positive leadership—organizational behavior that reveals and nurtures the highest level of human potential.



    Lynn has also had a robust clinical practice, providing leadership development, education, and training for a wide variety of companies and institutions, from the Kellogg Foundation to Harvard University’s Kennedy School, and to Google. She is the coauthor of Arrive and Thrive: 7 Impactful Practices for Women Navigating Leadership and the coeditor of Positive Organizing in a Global Society: Understanding and Engaging Differences for Capacity Building and Inclusion. She is also the author with Erika James of The Prepared Leader: Emerge from Any Crisis More Resilient Than Before*.



    In this conversation, Lynn and I discuss why crises are not isolated events, even through they are often treated that way. We explore the critical nature of trust and how to build it quickly in crisis. We then detail three key areas of trust that will help leaders begin to support a team shift towards better outcomes.

    Key Points



    Crises are not single events. They happen again and again, necessitating leaders preparation for them.

    In normal times, trust is key. In a time of crisis, it’s essential.

    Regular communication is essential in a crisis. Avoid the tendency to downplay risks. In fact, it’s useful to paint a picture of the worst case scenario.

    Leaders need to determine is there is a strong sense of a contractual obligation between them and their teams.

    It’s critical for leaders to assess the competence of their team to be able to respond to the crisis at hand.

    Frequent, high performance meetings are essential during a time of crisis.



    Resources Mentioned



    The Prepared Leader: Emerge from Any Crisis More Resilient Than Before* by Lynn Perry Wooten and Erika James



    Interview Notes

    Download my interview notes in PDF format (free membership required).

    Related Episodes



    How to Lead in Crisis, with Carol Taylor (episode 55)

    How to be Diplomatic, with Susan Rice (episode 456)

    The Way Out of Major Conflict, with Amanda Ripley (episode 529)

    The Starting Point for Inclusive Leadership, with Susan MacKenty Brady (episode 584)



    Discover More

    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    • 36 min
    Moving from Doing to Leading, with Gemma Aguiar

    Moving from Doing to Leading, with Gemma Aguiar

    Gemma Aguiar: Design Like Whoa

    Gemma Aguiar is the CEO of Design Like Whoa. Her firm helps brands like Sephora, Meta, the Golden State Warriors, and Spotify amplify their brand and strengthen their culture through sustainably focused apparel, accessories, and gifts. Her team serves clients by curating meaningful, high-quality products through partnership with local, minority-owned, sustainable, and mission-driven businesses. She's also an alum of the Coaching for Leaders Academy.



    In this episode, Gemma and I discuss the transition she made of doing it all herself early on in the business to now empowering a large team. We detail how she made this change tactically through calendar blocking, regular delegation, and intentional outcomes. Plus, we explore how asking for help is a critical muscle for all leaders to develop.

    Key Points



    Gemma didn’t see the growth potential in her traditional role, so she started her own, sustainable business.

    Being able to do lots of things well can be a trap for leaders. Shifting to delegate effectively is key.

    Getting clear on how time is used through planning and calendar blocking is essential.

    The responsibility of leadership changes over time. It’s key to be able to learn and adapt as the organization demands a different skillset.

    Asking for help is a critical competency for leaders. Getting better at this opens tons of doors.



    Resources Mentioned



    Design Like Whoa

    hello@designlikewhoa.com



    Related Episodes



    These Coaching Questions Get Results, with Michael Bungay Stanier (episode 237)

    Five Steps to Hold People Accountable, with Jonathan Raymond (episode 306)

    The Way to Capture the Power of Moments, with Chip Heath (episode 329)

    Align Your Calendar to What Matters, with Nir Eyal (episode 431)

    How to Define a Role, with Pat Griffin (episode 517)



    Discover More

    Activate your free membership for full access to the entire library of interviews since 2011, searchable by topic.

    • 33 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
1.1K Ratings

1.1K Ratings

uhfrgjnvdghb ,

Brilliant, insightful and compassionate

Dave is the friend that everyone goes to for advice. His podcast topics are insightful and presented in a way that is full of advice and tips that you can try immediately. Dave has his finger on the pulse of leadership and knows exactly what and from whom we need to hear and learn from. The curation of each episode is filled with additional leadership tools. This podcast makes you want to be a better leader and gives you the tools to do it.

jlsneda ,

Outstanding

Dave brings on industry leaders and provides thoughtful insights with easy to remember and simple tips any leader can use to improve their coaching. Dave knows coaching. This is a weekly must listen to. Dave also provides a comprehensive library of resources that hits the mark.

Conscious_Marketing_&_PR ,

Highly recommend!

This podcast has so many gold nuggets! It’s so enlightening and informative.

Top Podcasts In Business

iHeartPodcasts
NPR
Ramsey Network
Jocko DEFCOR Network
Guy Raz | Wondery
Andy Frisella #100to0

You Might Also Like

Essential Communications - Tom Henschel
HBR Presents / Muriel Wilkins
Mamie Kanfer Stewart
Pete Mockaitis
Ryan Hawk
Harvard Business Review

More by Innovate Learning