48 episodes

As an editor and writer for Fast Company magazine, KC Ifeanyi covers some of the most creative minds in film, television, business and beyond. In this podcast, he unpacks the most frustrating parts of the creative process by talking to psychologists, scholars, and experts who are on the forefront of understanding creativity.

Creative Conversation Fast Company

    • Business
    • 4.8, 40 Ratings

As an editor and writer for Fast Company magazine, KC Ifeanyi covers some of the most creative minds in film, television, business and beyond. In this podcast, he unpacks the most frustrating parts of the creative process by talking to psychologists, scholars, and experts who are on the forefront of understanding creativity.

    This ex-Google employee built a better platform for protesting

    This ex-Google employee built a better platform for protesting

    Creative Conversation is doing special three-part series covering specific issues within the ongoing protests for racial equality. Every Thursday this month, we’ll be spotlighting the creatives and professionals using their backgrounds, skills, and platforms to push for lasting change.

    Social media has been a natural component in organizing and disseminating information during these recurring protests against racial inequality.However, there's understandable concern in how these platforms may be censoring and suppressing posts, or remaining complicit in fueling misinformation and divisive rhetoric. As valuable as it can be to leverage massive platforms like Facebook, Tik Tok, and Twitter, there is an argument to have a less policed space or, at the very least, one that has activists' best interests in mind.That's exactly what Chloë Cheyenne Rogers set out to build with CommunityX, a platform connecting people locally and globally around causes and movements. In this conversation, Rogers explains the personal family trauma behind CommunityX and why it's important to rethink how we organize.

    • 28 min
    Black Trans Lives Matter, too—and this activist won’t let you forget it

    Black Trans Lives Matter, too—and this activist won’t let you forget it

    Creative Conversation is doing special three-part series covering specific issues within the ongoing protests for racial equality. Every Thursday this month, we’ll be spotlighting the creatives and professionals using their backgrounds, skills, and platforms to push for lasting change.

    It's easy for some to push violence against the black trans community squarely into an LGBTQ+ issue—and it certainly is. However, it's also a race issue that can't be ignored. And Ianne Fields Stewart is one of the many voices ready to remind you. Stewart is a New York City-based black transfeminine actor and dancer working at the intersection of art and activism. She's also the founder of The Okra Project, a collective that targets food insecurity within the black trans community. And the confluence of the recent murders and attacks on trans men and women during the larger movement for racial equality—all while COVID-19 is still very much a threat—has given Stewart a new perspective on her activism.

    • 33 min
    The First Step: How Affirm CEO Max Levchin handles risk-taking in launching a new business

    The First Step: How Affirm CEO Max Levchin handles risk-taking in launching a new business

    In this episode, our host Chris Denson talks to Max Levchin, co-founder and CEO at Affirm and co-founder of PayPal, about how to overcome a fear of failure and embrace risk in bringing forward new ideas. Then Chris dives into how established organizations need to be constantly iterating and incorporating their learnings from failures with Dilip Mistry, Partner at McKinsey and Company.

    • 19 min
    Dr. Jess, the internet's favorite psychiatrist, has a gameplan for your mental health

    Dr. Jess, the internet's favorite psychiatrist, has a gameplan for your mental health

    Creative Conversation is doing special three-part series covering specific issues within the ongoing protests for racial equality. Every Thursday this month, we’ll be spotlighting the creatives and professionals using their backgrounds, skills, and platforms to push for lasting change.
    The high anxieties surrounding all the political, social, and health-related unrest has pushed the conversation of mental health to the forefront—and the black community should be the most mindful.
    From COVID-19 affecting black people at disproportionate rates to the current battle for substantive changes to the mechanisms of racism running the country, the black community continues to face elevated levels of stress which can cause significant and lasting damage to physical and mental health.
    But Dr. Jess Clemons has some actionable advice to help you better manage your mental health. In this episode, she breaks down how to look for signs of mental distress, how black people can navigate the current social landscape in a healthy way, pro-tips for self-care, and more.

    • 39 min
    Janet Mock on how to build your creative credibility

    Janet Mock on how to build your creative credibility

    As if her career doesn’t already speak for itself, Janet Mock is ready to show you what she can really do. From her early days as an editor for People magazine, Mock has used her skills as a storyteller to springboard into becoming a New York Times bestselling author of two memoirs and, in her most recent pivot, a budding force in TV and film. With mega producer Ryan Murphy as her mentor, Mock has written for, directed, and produced a variety of projects including Pose, The Politician, and Hollywood. But now she's stepping out on her own.In this episode, Mock explains the importance of building those stepping stones toward your ultimate passion projects, how she learned to listen to other voices in the room, and why she chose the story of another, more infamous Janet to be her debut project through Netflix. 

    • 48 min
    Inside the subversively creative mind of Mark Mothersbaugh

    Inside the subversively creative mind of Mark Mothersbaugh

    You may know Mark Mothersbaugh from his days as the frontman for the art-punk band Devo, but his career scoring film, TV shows, and video games stretches over 200 titles including Thor: Ragnarok, Dawson's Creek, Rugrats, Crash Bandicoot, and, yes, Tiger King. Not only is Mark clearly prolific and versatile, but his creativity also expands into building his own unique instruments, creating subversive visual art (e.g., a giant ruby turd), and more. In this episode, Mark explains how dismantling and rebuilding the tools of your craft can lead to creative breakthroughs, and how he’s learned to reconcile his art with the mainstream, which may or may not include subliminal messaging.

    • 40 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
40 Ratings

40 Ratings

JoshCrist ,

Entertaining, insightful and actionable! 🔥

Whether you’re well established as someone who can translate creative energy into the impact you want to have on the world, or just getting started as a catalyst for change - this is a must-listen podcast for you! KC does an incredible job leading conversations that cover a huge breadth of topics related to the ins and outs of unleashing your creative spirit and living a life you can be proud of - from leaders who’ve actually walked the path. Highly recommend listening and subscribing!

JoshC7325 ,

Everyone should listen to this podcast!

It’s amazing!

Obibini ,

Missing This Podcast

I really need new episodes!!! Where are you? Pretty Please

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