181 episodes

The no nonsense, in-depth, actors-on-acting podcast from Filmmaker Magazine. Hosted by Peter Rinaldi. One working actor every episode doing a deep dive into their approach to the craft. No small talk, no celebrity stories, no inane banter—just the work.

Back To One Filmmaker Magazine

    • Arts
    • 3.9 • 78 Ratings

The no nonsense, in-depth, actors-on-acting podcast from Filmmaker Magazine. Hosted by Peter Rinaldi. One working actor every episode doing a deep dive into their approach to the craft. No small talk, no celebrity stories, no inane banter—just the work.

    Rebecca Wisocky

    Rebecca Wisocky

    Rebecca Wisocky plays Hetty Woodstone, the deceased Lady of the Manner, on the new CBS series “Ghosts,” where she’s a stand-out among stand-outs in its impressive comedy ensemble. In this episode, she talks about the absolute pleasure of working on that set and the interesting ways in which the large cast, who more often than not act together in the same shot, find the “music of the scene” together. She has pretty much mastered the art of the guest star role, and has played more than her share of villains. I get her to breakdown her latest in a recent episode of “Dopesick.” She talks about walking the line of behavioral specificity and story function. Plus we chat a bit about actor’s safety post-“Rust.” And much more! 
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    • 32 min
    Alex Hassell

    Alex Hassell

    Shakespeare on the stage is his first love, but Alex Hassell loves the camera and it loves him back. Currently he plays Vicious in “Cowboy Bebop,” the live-action remake of the popular Japanese anime series. On this episode, he talks about being attracted to roles that are difficult, how years of stripped-down live theater work at The Factory formed him as an actor, why he’s more at ease when he doesn’t know what’s going to happen next, his valuable contribution to Joel Coen’s “The Tragedy of Macbeth,” and how the particular challenges of acting on film excite him. Plus much more! “Cowboy Bebop” is available now to watch on Netflix and “The Tragedy of Macbeth” will premiere in select theaters on Christmas Day and globally on Apple TV+ on January 14th.
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    (photo by DWGH Photography)

    • 38 min
    Jon Bernthal

    Jon Bernthal

    From “The Walking Dead” and “Punisher” to “The Wolf of Wall Street,” “Small Engine Repair,” “The Many Saints of Newark,” and this month’s “King Richard,” Jon Bernthal has established himself as the hard-working, all-in, go-to, actor’s-actor of the moment. In this episode, he talks about some of the elements he uses—generosity, energy management, isolation, fear-as-fuel, group strength—to do his work, the one thing all great directors have in common, why he’d be just as grateful doing regional theater, plus much more!
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    • 42 min
    Ruth Negga

    Ruth Negga

    Ruth Negga loves words. And even someone who doesn’t particularly love words falls in love with the ones spoken by Ruth Negga. It’s not just her Irish accent. She uses words like a master craftsman uses tools. A profound humbleness. No pretension. Just the right tool, used at the right time, to make you understand, to make you believe. Obviously this goes for her acting work too. But, in true master-craftsman-style, there’s no sign of craft. You just believe. “Loving” got her an Academy Award nomination, her “Hamlet” got raves on both sides of the pond, and now “Passing,” Rebecca Hall’s stunning debut as a director, has them talking about Negga’s work again, this time opposite the wonderful Tessa Thompson. In this episode, she talks about the importance of gauging the atmosphere of the project, following instinct when it comes to trusting a director, the secret of playing an intoxicating character, and much much more.
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    • 27 min
    Jason Isaacs

    Jason Isaacs

    After 30 years in the business, with credits ranging from "Angels in America" to the "Harry Potter" films and everything in between, Jason Isaacs has cultivated an approach to the craft of acting aimed at bringing himself fully into the moment. As he talks about in this episode, that approach involves not memorizing his lines, erasing all descriptors in the script, making no decisions before seeing what the other actors bring. “I try to do nothing. I try to be an empty vessel.” In Fran Kranz’s "Mass"—a real-time, one-room, four-hander where every actor shines—Isaacs plays a father of a child killed in a school shooting. He gets to play with sadness, sarcasm, vulnerability, rage, restraint, revelation, and manages to ground it all in a solid emotional realism that leaves the viewer rocked and changed. What does Isaacs have to say about how he created this amazing performance that just might be one of the best we’ve been given this year? “I don’t remember…It’s like a black out.”
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    • 40 min
    Bertie Carvel

    Bertie Carvel

    He already had an Olivier Award for his amazing performance as Miss Trunchbull in “Matilda” when Bertie Carvel made his Broadway debut in that unforgettable role. He went on to win a Tony the next time he stepped on the New York stage, playing a young Rupert Murdoch in “Ink.” Notable recent television credits include the BBC series “Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell,” “Doctor Foster,” and in November he stars in “Dalgliesh” on Acorn TV. In this hour, I get him to reflect objectively about his process and philosophically about acting in general. He talks about why collaboration (or even the illusion of collaboration) is the key to unlock an actor’s potential, how sometimes a director’s “arrogance of ignorance” can actually be helpful, how he navigated the urge to share his ideas on the Joel Coen production “The Tragedy of Macbeth” (which will be out later this year), why he  believes a good actor can elevate mediocre material, plus MUCH more. 
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    • 56 min

Customer Reviews

3.9 out of 5
78 Ratings

78 Ratings

Revyous ,

It’s good but…

Seriously, man, stop with the “mmm” stuff when people are talking. It’s incredibly annoying. This is a podcast. Either speak or listen. Stop making all the crazy sounds. It really distracts from an otherwise great podcast.

AeeYouSerious ,

Actor to Actor

I discovered this podcast a couple of months ago and I am so glad I did. I’ve gone through and started listening from the oldest episode available and making my way to the newest episodes that are released. As an “early-stage” actor myself, I really enjoy the structure and approach this podcast takes with asking each actor about how they first begin to approach a script and then allowing them to tell some of their story. I also love how the host pushes each guest to authentically answer these questions. This is more than just a “woo woo” inspiration type of podcast (though those are valuable too!) this is one that has helped me more fully understand just how many different approaches one can have to acting. But at the end of the day all the actors seem to allude to the benefit of continually learning and being curious. Thanks for this!

Human Reviewing A Podcast ,

great

great podcast

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