631 episodes

Decoder is a show from The Verge about big ideas — and other problems. Verge editor-in-chief Nilay Patel talks to a diverse cast of innovators and policymakers at the frontiers of business and technology to reveal how they’re navigating an ever-changing landscape, what keeps them up at night, and what it all means for our shared future.

Decoder with Nilay Patel The Verge

    • Business
    • 4.1 • 2.7K Ratings

Decoder is a show from The Verge about big ideas — and other problems. Verge editor-in-chief Nilay Patel talks to a diverse cast of innovators and policymakers at the frontiers of business and technology to reveal how they’re navigating an ever-changing landscape, what keeps them up at night, and what it all means for our shared future.

    How Mercedes-Benz CEO Ola Källenius is refocusing for an electric future

    How Mercedes-Benz CEO Ola Källenius is refocusing for an electric future

    Mercedes-Benz CEO Ola Källenius became CEO in 2019 but has been working for Mercedes since 1993 in almost every part of the company. During that period, Mercedes spent time getting a lot bigger; the company famously merged with Chrysler for a time, forming a giant called DaimlerChrysler. But, over the past few years, it’s actually been getting much smaller and more focused. The Chrysler deal was undone and, just recently, Ola spun off the truck division into its own public company called Daimler Truck, leaving Mercedes-Benz to stand alone as a premium car brand.
    Car companies are either consolidating into giant conglomerates like Stellantis or shrinking and focusing like Mercedes. A lot of that is driven by the huge shift to electric vehicles and then, on top of that, to cars essentially becoming rolling computers. You’ll hear Ola refer to cars as “digital products” a lot — and to Mercedes itself as a tech company. (Actually, he says it’s a luxury and tech company.)
    Mercedes now has two new EVs, the EQS and the EQE, both of which have massive infotainment screens running Mercedes’ proprietary MBUX system, which even has its own voice assistant called Hey Mercedes. I had to ask Ola about Apple’s recent announcement that the next version of CarPlay would be able to take over every display in the car, including the instrument cluster. Apple showed a Mercedes logo on a slide during that presentation — so, is Ola ready to hand over his UI to Cupertino? 
    Let’s find out. Ola Källenius, CEO of Mercedes-Benz. Here we go.

    Links:
    Mercedes-Benz Vision EQXX concept car traveled over 1,000 km on a single charge
    Mercedes-Benz unveils sporty, ultra-long-range vision EQXX electric concept car
    The six-figure Mercedes-Benz EQS gets a 350-mile range rating
    Daimler AG to rebrand as Mercedes-Benz on Feb. 1
    Big automakers are breaking themselves apart to compete with Silicon Valley
    Mercedes-Benz reveals an electric G-Wagen concept for the future


    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/22936880

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 7 min
    How fandom built the internet as we know it, with Kaitlyn Tiffany

    How fandom built the internet as we know it, with Kaitlyn Tiffany

    The Verge is all about how technology make us feel. Our screens and our systems aren’t inert, or neutral – they create emotions, sometimes the strongest emotions anyone actually feels in their day to day lives. I’ve been thinking about that a lot ever since I read a new book called Everything I Need I Get From You: How Fangirls Created the Internet by Kaitlyn Tiffany, who was a culture reporter at The Verge several years ago. The thesis of her book is that online fandom, specifically the hardcore fans of the British boy band One Direction, created much of the online culture we live in today on social platforms. And her bigger thesis is that fandom overall is a cultural and political force that can’t be ignored; it shapes elections, it drives cultural conversation, it can bring joy to people who feel lonely, and it can result in dramatic harassment campaigns when fans turn on someone.


    Links:
    Kaitlyn Tiffany Verge Archive
    One Direction Playlist

    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/22930314

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 7 min
    What unions could mean for Apple with Zoe Schiffer

    What unions could mean for Apple with Zoe Schiffer

    Today is Apple’s Worldwide Developers Conference, or WWDC. It’s one of the biggest events of the year for Apple, one of the most important companies in the world. In fact, Apple is the most valuable company in the world, and it posted $18 billion in net profits in its first quarter — the most quarterly profit of any public company in history.
    So, as we go into another huge Apple event, I wanted to have Verge labor reporter Zoe Schiffer on to talk about something else that’s happening inside Apple: a brewing push by its retail employees to unionize, store by store, because they’re unhappy with their pay and working conditions. Zoe is really well-sourced; she has an inside look at this fight. So, she helps us explain how this all works and what it might mean.

    Links:
    Fired #AppleToo organizer files labor charge against the company
    Apple’s frontline employees are struggling to survive
    Apple hires anti-union lawyers in escalating union fight
    This is what Apple retail employees in Atlanta are fighting for
    First US Apple Store union election set for June 2nd in Atlanta
    Apple accused of union busting in new labor board filing

    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/22917648

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan. 
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 7 min
    How Ukraine’s wide use of cryptocurrency is playing out during the war

    How Ukraine’s wide use of cryptocurrency is playing out during the war

    Michael is president of the Blockchain Association of Ukraine and founder of the Kuna Exchange, which lets people buy cryptocurrency and swap between them. Earlier this year, the Ukrainian government set up wallets on Kuna and other exchanges to accept donations to the war effort in crypto; in April, Bloomberg reported it had received over $60 million in crypto donations.
    What’s more, earlier this year Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy also signed a virtual assets bill into law, which will recognize cryptocurrency as an asset in Ukraine when the war is over. As president of the Blockchain Association, Michael lobbied for this law, which you’ll hear him talk about — especially in the context of how little faith he has in the banking system. He says several times that, even before the war, it couldn’t be trusted and that people were already using a combination of crypto and dollars for large transactions instead of Ukraine’s actual currency, which is called the hryvnia.

    Links:
    Ukraine Readies NFT Sales as Crypto Donations Top $60 Million
    Ukraine's Zelenskyy Signs Virtual Assets Bill Into Law, Legalizing Crypto
    Crypto Goes to War in Ukraine
    Blockchain Association of Ukraine
    Russian tycoon Tinkov sells stake in TCS Group to billionaire Potanin
    The Bitcoin Boom
    Cypriot financial crisis
    The 2020 Global Crypto Adoption Index: Cryptocurrency is a Global Phenomenon


    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/22902506

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott. It was researched by Liz Lian and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.  
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 9 min
    The videos that don’t work on YouTube and the future of the creator business, with Nebula CEO Dave Wiskus

    The videos that don’t work on YouTube and the future of the creator business, with Nebula CEO Dave Wiskus

    One of our recurring jokes at The Verge is that every YouTuber eventually makes a video where they talk about how mad they are at YouTube. Whether it’s demonetization or copyright strikes or just the algorithm changing, YouTubers have to contend with a big platform that has a lot of power over their business, and they often don’t have the leverage to push back. 
    On this episode of Decoder, I’m talking to Dave Wiskus, the CEO of two really interesting companies: one is called Standard, which is a management company for YouTubers, and the other is Nebula, an alternative paid streaming platform where creators can post videos, take a direct cut of the revenue, and generally fund work that might get lost on YouTube. 
    What really stood out to me here is that Dave is in the business of making things: this conversation was really grounded in the reality of the creator business as it exists today and how that real business can support real people. You’ll hear it when we talk about Web3 and NFTs a little bit — Dave just thinks that stuff is b******t, and he says so because it’s not a business that exists now. That’s an important dynamic to think about — and one for more platforms to take seriously.

    Links:
    Dave's subscriber tweet
    Nebula

    Transcript:
    https://www.theverge.com/e/22840704

    Credits:
    Decoder is a production of The Verge, and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Creighton DeSimone and Jackie McDermott and it was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. Our Sr Audio Director is Andrew Marino and our Executive Producer is Eleanor Donovan.  
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 15 min
    Vergecast: Google CEO Sundar Pichai on Google I/O 2022

    Vergecast: Google CEO Sundar Pichai on Google I/O 2022

    Google I/O was this week and Nilay Patel and David Pierce had a chance to sit down with Google CEO Sundar Pichai to talk about the event and the products that were announced. This interview was recorded for The Vergecast, another podcast from The Verge. You can listen to The Vergecast wherever you get your podcasts – or just click here.

    We hope you enjoyed the interview. Decoder will be back again on Tuesday with an all new episode. See you then.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 32 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
2.7K Ratings

2.7K Ratings

Andelpink ,

Great Podcast but…

Nilay is a great host, he does a superb job interviewing people. Decoder has some of of the most interesting people in the tech and business worlds on regularly. Im excited to see who they have an each week. Having said that, it’s evident that this show is heavily influenced by liberal ideology. I question if Nilay truly believes in some of the principles he advocates for on the show. I have a feeling that the people writing his checks are influencing that aspect of the show. That’s why I only give it four stars.

JWPowell ,

Show lacks a consistent them

This show really lacks a consistent theme. It’s kind of a hodgepodge of auto executives and liberal attorneys. Some episodes can be interesting, but many are very boring. Nilay Patel is an excellent interviewer; however, this show is in need of an overhaul.

sonos is amazing ,

A must listen for insightful perspectives, great learning time and general fun

Thank you for bringing such relevant guests and for producing one of the few top notch podcasts out there. I love the show and the value that it brings to listeners.

Keep up the great work.

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