725 episodes

Decoder is a show from The Verge about big ideas — and other problems. Verge editor-in-chief Nilay Patel talks to a diverse cast of innovators and policymakers at the frontiers of business and technology to reveal how they’re navigating an ever-changing landscape, what keeps them up at night, and what it all means for our shared future.

Decoder with Nilay Patel Vox Media Podcast Network

    • Business
    • 4.1 • 2.9K Ratings

Decoder is a show from The Verge about big ideas — and other problems. Verge editor-in-chief Nilay Patel talks to a diverse cast of innovators and policymakers at the frontiers of business and technology to reveal how they’re navigating an ever-changing landscape, what keeps them up at night, and what it all means for our shared future.

    AI deepfakes are cheap, easy, and coming for the 2024 election

    AI deepfakes are cheap, easy, and coming for the 2024 election

    Our new Thursday episodes of Decoder are all about deep dives into big topics in the news, and this week we’re continuing our mini-series on one of the biggest topics of all: generative AI. Last week, we took a look at the wave of copyright lawsuits that might eventually grind this whole industry to a halt. Those are basically a coin flip — and the outcomes are off in the distance, as those cases wind their way through the legal system. 

    A bigger problem right now is that AI systems are really good at making just believable enough fake images and audio — and with tools like OpenAI’s new Sora, maybe video soon, too. And of course, it’s once again a presidential election year here in the US. So today, Verge policy editor Adi Robertson joins the show to discuss how AI might supercharge disinformation and lies in an election that’s already as contentious as any in our lifetimes — and what might be done about it.


    Links: 


    How the Mueller report indicts social networks

    Twitter permanently bans Trump

    Meta allows Trump back on Facebook and Instagram

    No Fakes Act wants to protect actors and singers from unauthorized AI replicas

    White House calls for legislation to stop Taylor Swift AI fakes

    Watermarks aren’t the silver bullet for AI misinformation

    AI Drake just set an impossible legal trap for Google

    Barack Obama on AI, free speech, and the future of the internet




    Credits:

    Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Kate Cox and Nick Statt and was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder.


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    • 41 min
    Crunchyroll President Rahul Purini on how anime took over the world

    Crunchyroll President Rahul Purini on how anime took over the world

    Today, I’m talking with Rahul Purini, the president of Crunchyroll, a streaming service focused entirely on anime — and really, the biggest anime service still going. Rahul has a long history with anime: he spent more than seven years at Funimation, a company that started in the 90s to distribute Dragon Ball Z to US audiences, before getting the top job at Crunchyroll.

    Anime might seem like niche content, but it’s not nearly as niche as you might think – our colleagues over at Polygon just ran a huge survey of anime viewers and found that 42% of Gen Z and 25% of millennials watch anime regularly. And Crunchyroll is growing with that audience — like most entertainment providers, the service absolutely exploded during the pandemic, going from 5 million paying subscribers in 2021 to more than 13 million as of last month. 

    But interestingly Rahul says Crunchyroll’s growth isn’t being driven by more and more people watching anime, but more and more anime fans — especially those watching pirated content — choosing to pay for it.

    Links: 

    Anime is huge, and we finally have numbers to prove it — Polygon

    Funimation is shutting down — and taking your digital library with it — The Verge

    Sony completes acquisition of Crunchyroll from AT&T — The Verge

    Funimation’s anime library is moving over to Crunchyroll — The Verge

    Crunchyroll now has more than 13 Million subscribers — Cord Cutters News

    Crunchyroll's CEO Colin Decker leaves company; Rahul Purini becomes new president — Anime News Network

    PlayStation keeps reminding us why digital ownership sucks — The Verge

    Sony’s Crunchyroll launches free 24-hour streaming channel — Variety

    Crunchyroll is adding mobile games to its subscription — The Verge

    How Is Funimation producing so many simuldubs? — Anime News Network



    Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23845221


    Credits: 

    Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Kate Cox and Nick Statt and was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. 
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Is the Apple Vision Pro All That?

    Is the Apple Vision Pro All That?

    The Decoder team is off this week. We’ll be back next week with both the interview and the new explainer episodes; we’re really excited about what’s on the schedule here. 

    In the meantime, I thought you all might enjoy a conversation I had with Kara Swisher, the Wall Street Journal’s Joanna Stern and Bloomberg’s Mark Gurman about the Apple Vision Pro. All of us have been covering Apple for a very long time, and we had a lot of fun swapping impressions, talking strategy, and sharing what we liked, and didn’t like, about Apple’s $3,500 headset. 

    Links: 

    Apple Vision Pro review: magic, until it’s not — The Verge

    The shine comes off the Vision Pro — The Verge

    Everything we know about Apple’s Vision Pro — The Verge

    Why some of Apple’s biggest fans are returning their Vision Pros — Bloomberg

    Apple’s Vision Pro Is an iPad killer, but not anytime soon — Bloomberg

    I worked, cooked and even skied with the new Apple Vision Pro — WSJ

    Vision Pro review: 24 hours in Apple’s mixed-reality headset — WSJ


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    • 1 hr 4 min
    How AI copyright lawsuits could make the whole industry go extinct

    How AI copyright lawsuits could make the whole industry go extinct

    Our new Thursday episodes are all about deep dives into big topics in the news, and for the next few weeks we’re going to stay focused on one of the biggest topics of all: generative AI. There’s a lot going on in the world of generative AI, but maybe the biggest is the increasing number of copyright lawsuits being filed against AI companies like OpenAI and StabilityAI.

    So for this episode, we’re going to talk about those cases, and the main defense the AI companies are relying on: an idea called fair use. To help explain this mess, I talked with Sarah Jeong. Sarah is a former lawyer and a features editor here at The Verge, and she is also one of my very favorite people to talk to about copyright. I promise you we didn’t get totally off the rails nerding out about it, but we went a little off the rails. The first thing we had to figure out was: How big a deal are these AI copyright suits?

    Links: 

    The New York Times sues OpenAI and Microsoft for copyright infringement --- The Verge

    The scary truth about AI copyright is nobody knows what will happen next — The Verge

    How copyright lawsuits could kill OpenAI — Vox

    How Adobe is managing the AI copyright dilemma, with general counsel Dana Rao --- The Verge

    Generative AI Has a visual plagiarism problem - IEEE Spectrum

    George Carlin estate sues creators of AI-generated comedy special — THR

    AI-Generated Taylor Swift porn went viral on Twitter. Here's how it got there — 404 Media

    AI copyright lawsuit hinges on the legal concept of ‘fair use’ — The Washington Post

    Intellectual property experts discuss fair use in the age of AI — Harvard Law School

    OpenAI says it’s “impossible” to create useful AI models without copyrighted material — Ars Technica


    Credits: 
    Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Kate Cox and Nick Statt and was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder. 
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 40 min
    DOJ’s Jonathan Kanter says the antitrust fight against Big Tech is just beginning

    DOJ’s Jonathan Kanter says the antitrust fight against Big Tech is just beginning

    Today, I’m talking with Jonathan Kanter, the Assistant Attorney General in charge of the Antitrust Division at the Department of Justice. Alongside FTC chair Lina Khan, Jonathan is one of the most prominent figures in the big shift happening in competition and antitrust in the United States. This is a fun episode: we taped this conversation live on stage at the Digital Content Next conference in Charleston, South Carolina a few days ago, so you’ll hear the audience, which was a group of fancy media company executives. 
    You’ll also hear me joke about Google a few times; fancy media execs are very interested in the cases the DOJ has brought against Google for monopolizing search and advertising tech — and Jonathan was very good at not commenting about pending litigation. But he did have a lot to say about the state of tech regulation, he and Khan’s track record so far, and why he thinks the concepts they’re pushing forward are more accessible than they’ve ever been.
    Links: 

    The top Biden lawyer with his sights on Apple and Google — Politico

    Judge blocks a merger of Penguin Random House and Simon & Schuster — NYT

    FTC’s Khan and DOJ’s Kanter beat back deals at fastest clip in decades — Bloomberg

    Google will face another antitrust trial September 9th, this time over ad tech — The Verge

    In the Google antitrust trial, defaults are everything and nobody likes Bing — The Verge

    Google Search, Chrome, and Android are all changing thanks to EU antitrust law — The Verge

    Aggregation Theory — Stratechery

    Adobe explains why it abandoned the Figma deal — The Verge

    How the EU’s DMA is changing Big Tech — The Verge

    Epic Games CEO calls out Apple’s DMA rules as ‘malicious compliance’ — TechCrunch


    Transcript: https://www.theverge.com/e/23831914

    Credits: 
    Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Kate Cox and Nick Statt and was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 34 min
    Why EV adoption in the US has hit a roadblock

    Why EV adoption in the US has hit a roadblock

    We’re very excited for today’s episode, because from now on we’ll be delivering you two Decoders every week. On Monday’s we’ll have our classic interviews with CEOs and other high-profile guests. But our new shorter Thursday episode – like today’s – will explain big topics in the news with Verge reporters, experts, and other friends of the show. 
    The big idea we’re going to jump into today does in fact have a lot of problems: electric vehicle adoption in the US. We invited Verge Transportation Editor Andy Hawkins, who’s been covering the EV transition for years, to walk us through what’s happening. 
    Late last year, Andy wrote a fantastic article called, “The EV Transition trips over its own cord.” It was all about the kind of paradox of the EV market right now: The momentum for electric cars in America feels like it’s started to hit serious snags, even though more people than ever before are going fully electric. The stakes are high, and there’s a lot going on. Let’s get into it. 

    Links: 

    The EV transition trips over its own cord — The Verge

    We’re down to just a handful of EVs that qualify for the full US tax credit — The Verge

    Electric cars were having issues. Then things got political — WSJ

    Tesla is becoming a partisan brand, says survey — Eletrek

    16 Republican governors urge Biden EPA to roll back proposed electric vehicle standards — USA Today

    Slow rollout of national charging system could hinder EV adoption — NYT

    Want to stare into the Republican soul in 2023? — Slate

    Biden vetoes Republican measure to block electric vehicle charging stations — NYT

    The Biden administration is pumping more money into EV charging infrastructure — The Verge

    GM should just bring back the Chevy Volt — The Verge



    Credits: 
    Decoder is a production of The Verge and part of the Vox Media Podcast Network.
    Today’s episode was produced by Kate Cox and Nick Statt and was edited by Callie Wright.
    The Decoder music is by Breakmaster Cylinder.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit podcastchoices.com/adchoices

    • 42 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
2.9K Ratings

2.9K Ratings

hybridarjun ,

Rock and Roll

Paul

sangwafive ,

I like the show but

This is the same guy who has ruined the vergecast by introducing a bad fit then failing to train them ! I tried quitting the show but I have failed so now I suffer through it because Niley who is the boss can’t give us a more intelligent person , Cranz ruined the vergecast and its all your fault.

Tim Le9 ,

Really love the second love for analysis

I think Nilay has a really interesting perspective so I appreciate how the second show allows a more deep dive into a topic than previously available. The AI copyright episode was particularly insightful! I appreciate the thoughtfulness and insights from The Verge staff

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