271 episodes

Each episode of Distillations podcast takes a deep-dive into a moment of science-related history in order to shed light on the present.

Distillations | Science History Institute Science History Institute

    • History
    • 4.5, 53 Ratings

Each episode of Distillations podcast takes a deep-dive into a moment of science-related history in order to shed light on the present.

    BONUS EPISODE: Pandemic Perspectives with Katrine Bosley

    BONUS EPISODE: Pandemic Perspectives with Katrine Bosley

    In this episode our producer Rigberto Hernandez talks to Katrine Bosley, who has worked in the biotech industry for more than 30 years. She tells us how CRISPR can be used to make faster diagnostic tests and how the hospital in Boston is creating a vaccine using a gene therapy method. 

    • 32 min
    BONUS EPISODE: Pandemic Perspectives with William Haseltine

    BONUS EPISODE: Pandemic Perspectives with William Haseltine

    We talk to William Haseltine, a scientist, entrepreneur, and author who has lived through three epidemics (polio, HIV/AIDS, and now COVID-19). He tells us how his lab in the 1980s was better prepared to deal with HIV/AIDS than we are now for COVID-19 and what he thinks lies ahead for us with this pandemic.  

    • 28 min
    BONUS EPISODE: Pandemic Perspectives with Susan Weiss

    BONUS EPISODE: Pandemic Perspectives with Susan Weiss

    Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians.
    In this episode we speak with Susan Weiss, a microbiology professor at the University of Pennsylvania and the director for the Penn Center for Research on Coronavirus and Emerging Pathogens. She’ll talk about her 40-years of experience researching coronaviruses, how her field reacted to the 2002 SARS and 2012 MERS outbreaks, and the importance of studying diseases that transfer from animals to humans. 
    Credits Hosts: Elisabeth Berry Drago
    Senior Producer: Mariel Carr
    Producer: Rigoberto Hernandez
    Researcher: Jessica Wade
    Additional production: Dan Drago

    • 37 min
    BONUS EPISODE: Pandemic Perspectives with Sue Desmond-Hellmann

    BONUS EPISODE: Pandemic Perspectives with Sue Desmond-Hellmann

    Over the next several weeks Distillations will be talking to people who have special insight into the coronavirus crisis—biomedical researchers, physicians, public health experts, and historians. 
    In this episode we speak with Sue Desmond-Hellmann, an oncologist who worked with HIV patients in San Francisco in the 1980s during the HIV/AIDS epidemic. She was also the CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation up until December 2019. Desmond-Hellmann tells us about her experiences working as a doctor during the HIV/AIDS epidemic and as a CEO of the Gates Foundation during the Ebola pandemic. She also discusses what we learned from HIV and Ebola that can help us in fighting COVID-19. 

    Credits Hosts: Alexis Pedrick and Elisabeth Berry Drago
    Senior Producer: Mariel Carr
    Producer: Rigoberto Hernandez
    Researcher: Lisa Grissom
    Image: by Krista Kennell/Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit.

    • 17 min
    BONUS EPISODE: Pandemic Perspectives with John C. Martin

    BONUS EPISODE: Pandemic Perspectives with John C. Martin

    The former CEO of Gilead Sciences tells about remdesivir, an older drug showing promise in the fight against COVID-19.

    • 15 min
    BONUS EPISODE: Spit Spreads Death

    BONUS EPISODE: Spit Spreads Death

    In the fall of 1918 the (misnomered) Spanish flu ravaged much of the world. Philadelphia was hit especially hard: it had the highest death rate of any major American city. Over the course of six weeks 12,000 people in the city died. Hospitals were overcrowded and bodies piled up.

    When the Mütter Museum embarked on the multiyear exhibition and public art project Spit Spreads Death, the curators and researchers behind it had no idea how relevant it would become—or how quickly.

    • 19 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
53 Ratings

53 Ratings

Trukr2020 ,

Great show

I’ve never written one of these reviews before. I just didn’t want that mean and confused review by the “scientist” to be the first one everyone sees, although it did get me to listen to the Roe v Wade v Rubella episode, Lol. As a “dumb” truck driver, I could clearly understand and appreciate the science behind the story, and I didn’t feel like you were pushing any political agenda one way or the other. I also didn’t hear anything negative towards those living with disabilities.

thejones912 ,

Great science reporting

This show has consistently excellent science reporting. If you like things that intersect between science, history, and culture, then you will love this.

MCM3000 ,

Used to be a science podcast

I’m a scientist by trade and have listened for over 4 years now. The science started to slip about a year ago. The episode linking rubella and abortion was a sad, shallow attempt to push a political agenda. As a mother of and advocate to people with disabilities: you owe people with disabilities an apology for that “reporting.” Although it seemed you tried to twist away from it, your message was clear: only lives without disability, and any form of suffering, deserve to live. You said you understood the disability community wants to be left out of the abortion fight. They do. Leave them out. If you could also stop aborting them and “assisting” them with suicide, that would be great, too.

You will never rob them of their dignity, no matter how hard you try. This episode literally made me throw up in my own mouth. Obviously, I’m unsubscribing and will never listen again to this trash.

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