130 episodes

You’ve heard about it, but do you really know it? In 3 minutes, we help you understand the true meaning behind the trends, concepts and acronyms that are making headlines. After listening, you will really know for sure.

Do you really know? Bababam

    • Education
    • 4.5, 2 Ratings

You’ve heard about it, but do you really know it? In 3 minutes, we help you understand the true meaning behind the trends, concepts and acronyms that are making headlines. After listening, you will really know for sure.

    What is philanthropy?

    What is philanthropy?

    What is philanthropy? Thanks for asking!


    Philanthropy is the feeling which pushes people to help those in need. Most often, it’s manifested by the rich giving to the poor. In times of crisis, like the Covid-19 pandemic, calls for philanthropy are commonplace. It’s almost as if private donations can take on the responsibilities of a state and its public institutions. The concept of charity has existed for a long time, and its philosophies are often associated with religion. While there is somewhat of an overlap, philanthropy is not entirely the same thing. Charity seeks to ease the impact of a social problem, whereas philanthropy looks to address the root cause. Some cite the birth of philanthropy as being during the Age of Enlightenment in Europe. But it really developed in late 19th century America, inspired by newly rich businessmen. The premise is simple: if you have a lot of money and you’re a good person, you should share it; give back to society a little of what it has given you.  


    Let's be real, it's also to have a clean conscience and good reputation, right?


    It’s also to have a clean conscience and good reputation. By giving, philanthropists can also receive...even more money! A lot of governments support philanthropy by granting tax reductions. In the United States, this figure is 35% of the donation, while in France it goes as high as 60% for companies. Without a doubt, the most well-renowned philanthropists are Bill and Melinda Gates, who donate 2 billion dollars a year through their foundation. Historically they have been the second largest funder of the World Health Organization, just behind the United States of America. Many other philanthropists create their own nonprofit foundations, to donate to causes like healthcare, education and extreme poverty. 


    So is it the rich who are going to help us beat Covid-19? And are the rich taking the place of governments then? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!


    To listen the last episodes, you can click here:
    What is Globish?
    What is the P-Spot?
    What is a heatwave?
     
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    • 3 min
    What is Globish?

    What is Globish?

    What is Globish? Thanks for asking!


    Globish is a simplified version of English. In theory, it enables non-native English speakers to communicate with others anywhere across the planet, but it’s also perceived as a danger to other languages, including English. The Lingua Franca was a similar concept which mixed several Latin languages. Between the 13th and 19th centuries, it was used to do business in ports around the Mediterranean Sea. There’s no doubt that English is the equivalent in this day and age. It allows people all around the world to communicate. Well, at least a form of English. Some have referred to this as simplified English, others talk of “English as a lingua franca”. Another alternative name is Globish, a term which was invented in the 2000s by French businessman Jean-Paul Nerrière. He came up with a method for learning and speaking this form of English, which uses simplified grammar structures and only requires a vocabulary of 1,500 common English words.


    Do you have any concrete examples and tips?


    Here's an example. In globish you don’t say “I went to my niece and nephew's party the other weekend and I played the piano”. Rather you say “At the party of my children's brother the other day, I played an instrument with black and white keys”. Depending on the business sector you work on, it may be wise to learn the related industry jargon. There’s no specific accent but you definitely need to work on your pronunciation. The aim isn’t to sound English in particular, but just to be understood. Nerrière says that globish should be spoken slowly; it’s also important to articulate, use short sentences and avoid idioms or jokes.




    Is there an academy for Globish? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!


    To listen the last episodes, you can click here:
     What is a heatwave?
    What is fatphobia?
    What is a micro adventure?
     
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    • 3 min
    What is the P-Spot?

    What is the P-Spot?

    What is the P-Spot? Thanks for asking!


    Most of the time, when we hear the word prostate, we associate it with cancer. We don’t necessarily know where it’s situated in the male body and even less so its potential as an erogenous zone! Let’s take an anatomy lesson then. The prostate, or male P-spot, is a small gland around the size of a walnut which can be found just below the bladder. It weighs between 20 and 40 grams, growing bigger as a man ages. Its role in the body is to produce the seminal liquid found in semen. This protects sperm from the acidic environment of the female vagina. The easiest way to access the prostate is through the rectum. And many men have discovered it to be a source of sexual pleasure.


    Why this sexual practice is often rejected by heterosexual men?


    In our collective subconscious, non-standard sexual practices are often rejected. The traditional expectation is that men are virile. They penetrate women, and aren’t penetrated themselves, even with a finger. But in reality, the idea that prostate play is limited to homosexuals is just a social construct.The prostate is to men what the clitoris was to women for a long time. That is a sexual organ which gives a lot of pleasure, but tends to be forgotten. Many aren’t even aware of its existence. The prostate is a great unknown of male sexuality, cannibalized by the all-powerful penis. It’s also been shown that massage can reduce the risk of prostate cancer, give stronger erections and help those struggling with premature ejaculation. Not to mention the longer and more intense orgasms, felt throughout the body, that can be brought on by prostate stimulation. Finally, there’s no refractory period, unlike with a penile orgasm. So you can have a prostate orgasm and go again shortly after. And you thought only women could have multiple orgasms!


    So, how does it work then? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!


    To listen the last episodes, you can click here:
    What is a heatwave?
    What is fatphobia?
    What is a micro adventure?
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 3 min
    What is a heatwave?

    What is a heatwave?

    What is a heatwave? Thanks for asking!


    We’re experiencing more intense and frequent heatwaves than ever before, and it’s one of the most tangible effects of climate change. These summer periods of extreme heat are a threat to the elderly, children and the poor. To meet the World Meteorological Organization’s definition of a heatwave, the period must last 5 days or longer. The daily maximum temperature must also be at least 5° higher than the average maximum temperature. This means the requirements can vary by region. Some nations have their own definition of a heatwave. For example, the UK’s Met Office uses a system called Heat Health Watch. To determine whether a heatwave is occurring, the maximum daytime temperature and minimum nighttime temperature are compared to regional thresholds. A four-level system is used to score each Local Authority area, with Level 4 being the highest. 


    So what actually causes a heatwave then?


    Scientifically speaking, heatwaves are the result of trapped air. High-pressure systems force the air downwards, forming a cap over an affected area. This prevents precipitation from forming, leading to a continual buildup of heat. In the Northern Hemisphere, this happens most often in July and August, even if we have now started seeing heatwaves earlier in the year. The problem is that heatwaves have a number of consequences. First of all, think of the environmental impact. They lead to shortages of drinking water, destroy food-producing crops, increase pollution and the risk of forest fires. But there are also direct human health issues. Extreme heat wears out those who are most vulnerable, like the elderly, children or the sick. It can make existing illnesses worse or cause serious heatstrokes.


    What are the guidelines? Who has the greater risks? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!


    To listen the last episodes, you can click here:
    What is a micro adventure?
    What is an eco-friendly beach?
    What is Blackface?
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 4 min
    What is fatphobia?

    What is fatphobia?

    What is fatphobia? Thanks for asking!


    Being overweight is a stigma. While around 13% of the world’s population are obese, they are largely absent from the public limelight and often find themselves the target of mockery or discrimination. Overweight people are humiliated and ostracised throughout their lives, having to put up with regular criticisms about their lifestyle and appearance. This is what’s known as fatphobia, a form of discrimination which can have a harmful effect on those on the receiving end. Fatphobia is often left out of discussions on the struggle against different forms of discrimination. But it nevertheless causes real suffering on a daily basis. It can manifest itself in many different forms. For example assuming that obese people make bad life choices, ranking people according to their weight or claiming they are responsible for how they are. Fatphobia victims often end up believing they have no worth because it’s the message that’s transmitted to them constantly. Putting themselves down in turn affects their self-esteem and quality of life. Sometimes, they isolate from the rest of society or take on unhealthy habits.


    But why are overweight people rejected to such an extent?


    Modern Western society has led us to believe that a person’s weight and figure play a major part in how attractive they are. Being obese is therefore equated with ugliness, inferiority and even immorality. Fatphobia has become integrated into the general way of thinking for most people. Even those who aren’t overweight obsess about not putting on extra pounds before the summer holiday season. Online algorithms also seem to now be pre-programmed with fatphobia! A number of plus size influencers have noticed that their posts are censored by social media platforms. This is an example of a phenomenon known as shadow banning. American singer Lizzo accused TikTok of banning clips of her in a bikini, when similar clips of other slimmer women were allowed to remain online. This is the kind of discrimination that can lead to body shaming and increase fatphobia.


    But whose side are social media on? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!


    To listen the last episodes, you can click here:
    What is a micro adventure?
    What is an eco-friendly beach?
    What is Blackface?
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 3 min
    What is a micro adventure?

    What is a micro adventure?

    What is a micro adventure? Thanks for asking!


    When you think “adventure”, you most likely think of an exotic destination halfway across the globe. But it’s easy to have an exciting change of scenery close to home, without compromising your carbon footprint. Let’s talk about micro adventures. Micro adventures are generally short, spontaneous and local. They take place outdoors and don’t require a high budget. If there’s one intrinsic rule to the concept, it’s that there are no fixed rules. Covid-19 lockdown measures and travel restrictions have revived the micro adventure concept. It’s a personal and inventive way of experiencing unique moments at walking or cycling distance from where you live.


    How can we explain the rise of the micro advendures?


    British adventurer and author Alastair Humphreys was responsible for the rise of the microadventure. The idea is based on a simple principle: within a few miles of your home, there must be some scope for adventure which can be reached through an original means of transport. You just need to change your existing habits. Switch your car or travelcard for a kayak, bike or simply a pair of trainers. Whatever you need to leave home and start your microadventure. With the virus still spreading and a major economic crisis likely to last for some time, there is fair cause for concern about the near future. All the same, after months of Netflix, online yoga classes and homemade bread, you’re no doubt keen to make the most of summer. And a micro adventure could be just the ticket, without needing to travel far, spend a lot of money or make complicated arrangements.


    What about those of us who struggle to come up with ideas for a microadventure? Is there a risk that the micro adventure could turn into a form of mass tourism? In under 3 minutes, we answer your questions!


    To listen the last episodes, you can click here:
    What is an eco-friendly beach?
    What is Blackface?
    What is TikTok ?
     
    See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

    • 3 min

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