89 episodes

History Ireland magazine has now been in production for over 27 years. 

The History Ireland Podcast covers a wide variety of topics, from the earliest times to the present day, in an effort to give the listener a sense of the distant past but also to offer a contemporary edge.

History Ireland History Ireland

    • History
    • 4.8 • 6 Ratings

History Ireland magazine has now been in production for over 27 years. 

The History Ireland Podcast covers a wide variety of topics, from the earliest times to the present day, in an effort to give the listener a sense of the distant past but also to offer a contemporary edge.

    Ulysses in history—history in Ulysses

    Ulysses in history—history in Ulysses

     In this centenary year of its publication, the History Ireland Hedge School considers James Joyce’s Ulysses, set in Dublin on a single day, 16 June 1904. What was the history of the book? What is the history in the book? Join Tommy Graham in discussion with Sylvie Kleinman, Felix Larkin, Katherine McSharry and Dan Mulhall.


    The Hedge School series of podcasts is produced by History Ireland and the Wordwell Group. For more information or to subscribe, visit historyireland.com



    This Hedge School supported by the National Library of Ireland.

    Image: Nora Barnacle and James Joyce in London on their wedding day, 4 July 1931, 27 years after they left Ireland together. (NLI)

    • 1 hr 17 min
    Burning the Big House—the story of the Irish country house in a time of war and revolution (Yale University Press)

    Burning the Big House—the story of the Irish country house in a time of war and revolution (Yale University Press)

    Over the course of the Irish War of Independence and Civil War, nearly 300 ‘Big Houses’ (those belonging to aristocrats with in excess of 2,000 acres), 20% of a total of c. 1,500, were burned to the ground. Why? Author Terence Dooley, Professor of History at Maynooth University and Director of the Centre for the Study of Historic Irish Houses and Estates, in conversation with History Ireland editor Tommy Graham, provides some answers.



    Burning the Big House—the story of the Irish country house in a time of war and revolution is published by Yale University Press.

    Further information: https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300260748/burning-the-big-house/



    The Hedge School series of podcasts is produced by History Ireland and the Wordwell Group. For more information or to subscribe, visit historyireland.com

    • 37 min
    The internal politics of the IRA before the Civil War

    The internal politics of the IRA before the Civil War

    The Anglo-Irish Treaty sparked turmoil within the IRA. Some accepted it and joined the ranks of the Provisional Government’s new ‘National Army’; some remained neutral; the majority opposed it, but with the added twist that on the eve of the Civil War there were two anti-Treaty factions of the IRA, not one. Two Army Conventions, on 26 March and 18 June 1922, failed to resolve these differences. To make sense of these complexities, join History Ireland editor Tommy Graham in discussion with Síobhra Aiken, John Borgonovo, John Dorney and Brian Hanley.



    The Hedge School series of podcasts is produced by History Ireland and the Wordwell Group. For more information or to subscribe, visit historyireland.com



    This podcast is supported by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media under the Decade of Centenaries 2012-2023 Initiative.

    Image: Anti-Treaty IRA on Dublin’s Grafton Street in spring 1922. (Mercier Archive)

    • 1 hr 9 min
    Northern Ireland in 1922

    Northern Ireland in 1922

    While an uneasy peace prevailed in the South following the Truce of July 1921, in Northern Ireland communal violence continued to rage, exemplified most notoriously on 24 March 1922 by the killings of a ‘respectable’ Catholic family, the McMahons, by an RIC ‘murder gang’. Was this a ‘one-off’ by a ‘rogue’ element or part of a wider policy of intimidation? And as the Treaty split drifted towards civil war in the South, how did events in the North and along the border affect the situation? To discuss these and related questions, join History Ireland editor Tommy Graham in discussion with Kieran Glennon, Paddy Mulroe, Seán Bernard Newman and Margaret O’Callaghan.


    The Hedge School series of podcasts is produced by History Ireland and the Wordwell Group. For more information or to subscribe, visit historyireland.com



    This podcast is supported by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media under the Decade of Centenaries 2012-2023 Initiative.

    Image: The funerals of the victims of the McMahon murders in Belfast on 26 March 1922..

    • 1 hr 17 min
    ‘We English protest’—anti-colonial solidarity in the metropole

    ‘We English protest’—anti-colonial solidarity in the metropole

    So said the long white apron of suffragette and socialist Margaret Buckmaster at a protest in July 1921 organised by the Peace with Ireland Council (PIC). How significant were such anti-colonial solidarity movements in Britain in the revolutionary period? How effective were they? To address these and related questions, join History Ireland editor Tommy Graham in discussion with Darragh Gannon, Angus Mitchell and Mo Moulton.


    The Hedge School series of podcasts is produced by History Ireland and the Wordwell Group. For more information or to subscribe, visit historyireland.com



    This Hedge School is supported by the Department of Foreign Affairs’ Reconciliation Fund.

    Image: Margaret Buckmaster at the demonstration in Trafalgar Square organised by the Peace with Ireland Council and 'Women's Freedom League'  on 2 July 1921. (Bibliothèque nationale de France)

    • 55 min
    A Century of An Garda Síochána

    A Century of An Garda Síochána

    When the Civic Guard—later renamed An Garda Síochána—was founded in February 1922, the force it replaced, the Royal Irish Constabulary, was itself barely a century old. How much of the culture of the latter passed over to the former? What was the law-and-order situation in 1921/22? Why and how was it possible to set up an unarmed police force during a civil war? To address these and related questions, join History Ireland editor Tommy Graham in discussion with Elizabeth Malcolm, Fearghal McGarry and Liam McNiffe.


    The Hedge School series of podcasts is produced by History Ireland and the Wordwell Group. For more information or to subscribe, visit historyireland.com



    This podcast is supported by the Department of Tourism, Culture, Arts, Gaeltacht, Sport and Media under the Decade of Centenaries 2012-2023 Initiative.

     
    Image: Eoin O’Duffy, second Commissioner of An Garda Síochána, following the May/June 1922 mutiny and the subsequent resignation of Michael Staines.

    • 1 hr 17 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
6 Ratings

6 Ratings

Fordham Flash ,

Fordham Flash

The best Irish history podcast.

Wilf Boggins ,

History Ireland

Excellent always, though you could think there was no history in Ireland except for the early twentieth century. Again though great programmes

Top Podcasts In History

Wondery
Double Elvis | Amazon Music
Wondery
Audioboom Studios
Sarah Marshall
Dan Carlin

You Might Also Like

RTÉ Radio 1
Donal Fallon
Newstalk
Fin Dwyer
RTÉ Documentary on One
The Irish Times