202 episodes

The people behind The Intercept’s fearless reporting and incisive commentary discuss the crucial issues of our time: national security, civil liberties, foreign policy, and criminal justice. Plus interviews with artists, thinkers, and newsmakers who challenge our preconceptions about the world we live in.

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill The Intercept

    • News
    • 4.7 • 5.6K Ratings

The people behind The Intercept’s fearless reporting and incisive commentary discuss the crucial issues of our time: national security, civil liberties, foreign policy, and criminal justice. Plus interviews with artists, thinkers, and newsmakers who challenge our preconceptions about the world we live in.

    Introducing American ISIS

    Introducing American ISIS

    We'd like to introduce you to American ISIS, a new podcast from The Intercept and Topic Studios. American ISIS offers the most detailed account yet of an American who lived and died inside the Islamic State. This is the first episode. Listen to the full eight-episode documentary podcast on audible.com/AmericanISIS.
     
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    • 36 min
    American ISIS Offers a Firsthand Look Inside the Caliphate

    American ISIS Offers a Firsthand Look Inside the Caliphate

    For more than six months, The Intercept’s Trevor Aaronson communicated with Russell Dennison, an American man who traveled to Syria and joined the Islamic State. This week on Intercepted: Aaronson, an investigative reporter, discusses American ISIS, the newest Audible Original podcast documentary from The Intercept and Topic Studios, in which he chronicles the story of Russell Dennison, one of the first American citizens to join ISIS and fight with the group in Syria. Almost daily, Dennison communicated with Aaronson, sending him hours of audio chronicling his conversion to Islam, his turn to extremism, and his journey to Syria. Aaronson talks with Intercept reporter Murtaza Hussain about his reporting and what he learned from Dennison.
     
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    • 37 min
    Corporate Counterinsurgency Against Line 3 Pipeline Resistance

    Corporate Counterinsurgency Against Line 3 Pipeline Resistance

    Water protectors are traveling in growing numbers to stand with the Anishinaabe-led movement to stop the construction of Line 3, a tar sands oil pipeline.


    This week on Intercepted: Intercept reporter Alleen Brown takes us to northern Minnesota, a flashpoint in the fight to halt the expansion of the fossil fuel industry as the climate crisis deepens. Direct actions and other protests against Line 3 are just heating up and more than 500 people have already been arrested or issued citations. Opponents of the Line 3 pipeline are urging the Biden administration to intervene to stop construction, but his administration recently moved to defend the pipeline. Water protectors are being greeted by an intensifying police response and what scholars are calling a corporate counterinsurgency campaign led by the pipeline company, Enbridge.
     
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    • 41 min
    The Crisis of Care

    The Crisis of Care

    Domestic workers — nannies, house cleaners, and care workers — are one of the fastest-growing labor groups in the U.S. They are also some of the most undervalued and least-protected workers, a factor further exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic.


    This week on Intercepted: Vanessa Bee and Murtaza Hussain interview Ai-jen Poo, co-founder and executive director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance, about the impact of Covid-19 on these vulnerable yet essential workers. They also discuss how the exclusion of labor protections for domestic workers has roots in slavery and how President Joe Biden’s jobs plan could ensure historically denied rights. And we hear stories from domestic workers themselves as they organize for their rights on International Domestic Workers Day in New York City.
     
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    • 35 min
    Stealing Children to Steal the Land

    Stealing Children to Steal the Land

    Last month, the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc First Nation uncovered a mass grave of 215 children on the grounds of a former residential school in British Columbia, Canada. This week on Intercepted: Naomi Klein speaks with residential school survivor Doreen Manuel and her niece Kanahus Manuel about the horrors of residential schools and the relationship between stolen children and stolen land. Doreen’s father, George Manuel, was a survivor of the Kamloops Indian Residential School, where unmarked graves of children as young as 3 years old were found. Kanahus’s father, Arthur Manuel, was also a survivor of the Kamloops residential school. This intergenerational conversation goes deep on how the evils of the Kamloops school, and others like it, have reverberated through a century of Manuels, an experience shared by so many Indigenous families, and the Manuel family’s decades long fight to reclaim stolen land.


    Warning: This episode contains highly distressing details about the killing, rape, and torture of children. If you are a survivor and need to talk, there is contact information in the show notes. 


    If you are a former residential school student in distress, or have been affected by the residential school system and need help, you can contact the 24-hour Indian Residential Schools Crisis Line: 1-866-925-4419
    Additional mental-health support and resources for Indigenous people are available here.  


    Show notes:


    Doreen Manuel can be found @DoreenManuel1 and www.runningwolf.ca 
    Kanahus can be found at @kanahusfreedom and www.tinyhousewarriors.com


    “Unsettling Canada: A National Wake Up Call,” by Arthur Manuel


    “The Reconciliation Manifesto: Recovering the Land, Rebuilding the Economy,” by Arthur Manuel


    “From Brotherhood to Nationhood: George Manuel and the Making of the Modern Indian Movement,” by Peter McFarlane with Doreen Manuel, afterword by Kanahus Manuel


    “The Fourth World: An Indian Reality,” by George Manuel and Michael Posluns


    “These Walls” directed by Doreen Manuel
     
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    • 1 hr 4 min
    Killed in the Darkness

    Killed in the Darkness

    When a police officer shoots and kills someone — and there aren’t any witnesses — can we trust the police to investigate themselves?


    This week on Intercepted: Antoine and Tammy Bufford's son, Cortez, was shot and killed by a St. Louis police officer in 2019. Nearly two years later, the city is still investigating Cortez’s case. No charges have been filed. And the Bufford family is still looking for answers. The police kill more people per capita in St. Louis than in any other American city. Seventy-two percent of these people are Black, like Cortez.


    The Chicago-based Invisible Institute recently partnered with The Intercept to examine the circumstances of Cortez’s death. Their resulting investigation, reported by Alison Flowers and Sam Stecklow, sheds new light in the search for truth about this police killing.
     
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    • 35 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
5.6K Ratings

5.6K Ratings

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When we hired an in home caregiver, she was a full time employee and treated so with a contract, days off, healthcare benefits etc. However, both our gardeners and house cleaners who come once or twice a week, these are part-time employees. However, all of California is an ‘at will’ employment and that provides little job security for us all.

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Fantastic

I learn a lot

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Exceptional

Terrific journalism in the finest muck-raking tradition. For the moron right, moaning about fair and balanced in these reviews, TRUTH does not involve finding nice things to say about the crooks and charlatans who prop up your twisted world view. Keep rocking it Intercepted.

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