200 episodes

The Audio Long Reads podcast is a selection of the  Guardian’s long reads, giving you the opportunity to get on with your day while listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer, including in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more

The Guardian's Audio Long Reads The Guardian

    • Society & Culture

The Audio Long Reads podcast is a selection of the  Guardian’s long reads, giving you the opportunity to get on with your day while listening to some of the finest journalism the Guardian has to offer, including in-depth writing from around the world on immigration, crime, business, the arts and much more

    False witness: why is the US still using hypnosis to convict criminals?

    False witness: why is the US still using hypnosis to convict criminals?

    For decades, US law enforcement has used ‘forensic hypnosis’ to help solve crimes – yet despite growing evidence that it is junk science, this method is still being used to send people to death row. By Ariel Ramchandani. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

    • 29 min
    Kudos, leaderboards, QOMs: how fitness app Strava became a religion

    Kudos, leaderboards, QOMs: how fitness app Strava became a religion

    The Strava app offers community, training data and motivation to millions of athletes. Even runners who dislike tech can’t bear to be without it. By Rose George. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

    • 26 min
    The weird magic of eiderdown

    The weird magic of eiderdown

    In Iceland, the harvesting of these precious feathers has created a peculiar bond between human and duck. What can this unique relationship teach us? By Edward Posnett. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

    • 28 min
    A scandal in Oxford: the curious case of the stolen gospel

    A scandal in Oxford: the curious case of the stolen gospel

    What links an eccentric Oxford classics don, billionaire US evangelicals, and a tiny, missing fragment of an ancient manuscript? Charlotte Higgins unravels a multimillion-dollar riddle. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

    • 38 min
    The Zaghari-Ratcliffes' ordeal: British arrogance, secret arms deals and Whitehall infighting

    The Zaghari-Ratcliffes' ordeal: British arrogance, secret arms deals and Whitehall infighting

    While his wife suffers in an Iranian jail, Richard Ratcliffe fights on for her release. But he fears she cannot cope for much longer. By Patrick Wintour. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

    • 36 min
    Bring up the bodies: the retired couple who find drowning victims

    Bring up the bodies: the retired couple who find drowning victims

    Gene and Sandy Ralston are a married couple in their 70s, who also happen to be among North America’s leading experts at searching for the dead. By Doug Horner. Help support our independent journalism at theguardian.com/longreadpod

    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

Surohan7 ,

My favorite podcast...but

Please keep your wonderful British readers. As an American myself, I love to hear them and cringe at the American voices that come across as jarring and pretentious. Also, I agree with another reviewer who hates the loud ad in the middle.

mdg999 ,

Change the readers!

I really want to love this but all of the readers sounds robotic, over enunciating everything. It makes beautiful tender stories sound clinical. I haven’t made it through a whole episode yet because of the readers.

ccr226 ,

Please have more British readers and a more natural tone!

I love the article choices and the long form reading format. Several have been well read by British speakers with natural intonation. Particularly the episodes on the Zaghari-Ratcliffes unjust suffering and the Dirk Obbink’s corrupt sales of Oxford antiquities were impeccably researched and delivered.

However, the last one I tried to listen to (America Squandered Its Cold War Victory) sounded like a computerized voice. I had to turn it off after a minute, even though I would love to hear about this topic. Same goes for the Mari Kondo episode. And as an American, I agree with the last reviewer: I listen to British podcasts because I am sick of the whiny and saccharine American accent. Please have more British or international readers!! That’s why we’re here!

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