181 episodes

From the stuff your mother never told you, to the stuff your doctor never learned, On Health features taboo-busting conversations that demystify and de-stigmatize our bodies, all while bridging the gap between conventional medicine and wellness. Join Yale-trained MD & midwife Aviva Romm and her line-up of expert guests as they discuss everything from periods to menopause, sex to reproductive health politics, and motherhood to mental health. Each week, Dr. Romm will be exploring the science and wisdom of how our bodies work, what makes us well, what gets in the way, and how we can live our best lives on our terms, authentically and bravely. You can expect to learn more about topics such as women's brain health, cesareans, microbiome seeding, women’s sexual health, and much more. Plus, you'll get Aviva’s musings, tips, and guidance from 35+ years of helping women take back their health—and their lives. The new medicine for women is here!

On Health Aviva Romm MD

    • Health & Fitness
    • 4.8 • 1.2K Ratings

From the stuff your mother never told you, to the stuff your doctor never learned, On Health features taboo-busting conversations that demystify and de-stigmatize our bodies, all while bridging the gap between conventional medicine and wellness. Join Yale-trained MD & midwife Aviva Romm and her line-up of expert guests as they discuss everything from periods to menopause, sex to reproductive health politics, and motherhood to mental health. Each week, Dr. Romm will be exploring the science and wisdom of how our bodies work, what makes us well, what gets in the way, and how we can live our best lives on our terms, authentically and bravely. You can expect to learn more about topics such as women's brain health, cesareans, microbiome seeding, women’s sexual health, and much more. Plus, you'll get Aviva’s musings, tips, and guidance from 35+ years of helping women take back their health—and their lives. The new medicine for women is here!

    Enough Already: Protecting Kids from Environmental Toxins

    Enough Already: Protecting Kids from Environmental Toxins

    Every time you're fuelling your car or walking into your home and don’t have to worry about lead exposure, it’s thanks to my guest today, no less than one of my heroes, Dr. Phillip Landrigan. But the question still remains— how can you protect your children from environmental toxins? Chemicals are everywhere in today’s world, and it’s impossible to protect your child completely from the risks that they pose...but don’t panic! Dr. Landrigan and I discuss the 3 biggest hazards to your child’s health and what you, your community, and policymakers can do—starting today—to keep families safe.   



    Dr. Landrigan and I discuss:  



    How to detect lead poisoning symptoms in your child and how often they should be screened for lead exposure  

    The two negative developments in today’s society that threaten to undo all the progress made in lowering lead exposure   

    How you can test for lead in your home and what you can do to protect your family  

    The known (and unknown) risks of manufactured chemicals  

    Pesticides in our food and the truth about GMOs  

    Keeping your baby safe from toxins during pregnancy  

    What's it going to take to make changes to public policy across the board 

      

     
    Philip Landrigan is an American epidemiologist and pediatrician and one of the world's leading advocates of children's health. Dr. Landrigan was the first to document the effects of lead poisoning on American children, which led to the US government’s decision to remove lead from paint and gasoline. Dr. Landrigan has published over 500 scientific papers and has written several books for parents, including his latest, co-authored with his wife Mary Landrigan, Children and Environmental Toxins: What Everyone Needs to Know. 
     


    Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in to your body, yourself, and this podcast! Please share the love by sending this to someone in your life who could benefit from the kinds of things we talk about in this space. Make sure to follow your host on Instagram @dr.avivaromm and go to avivaromm.com to join the conversation.  
     
     

    • 50 min
    How Doulas Make a Difference with Tracie Collins

    How Doulas Make a Difference with Tracie Collins

    George Floyd, Brianna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery—these are names you know. I hope. But what about Kira Dixon Johnson, Yolanda Kadima, and Tatia Oden French? These are names that you may not have heard. They are the names of Black women who needlessly died in childbirth, several of whom reported symptoms and concerns to their medical provider prior, but who were dismissed or ignored. 
     
    My guest today, Tracie Collins, is passionate about changing both the statistics and the narrative surrounding Black birthing people. As the founder of the National Black Doulas Association, she's breaking down racial disparities in the medical system and fighting against America’s unacceptable Black maternal death rate by ensuring Black women know their birthing options. She joins me on the podcast to share more about the realities, challenges, and burdens of Black women, and how change requires changing the medical system. 
     
      
    Tracie and I discuss:  
      

    How to hold space for both having the data to change the system while not creating more anxiety and stress for black women   

    The story of Anarcha and how the history of pain tolerance and medical inequalities goes back to slavery     

    The meaning of full spectrum doula work    

    How midwifery led Tracie to become more radical in her personal and professional life    

    Tracie's current projects and sources of creative inspiration  

    Advice for people looking to work with a doula who may have accessibility barriers  

      

    Tracie Collins has been published in Parents, Rolling Stone, and Essence, and is a contributor to Black Love, CNN Health, and NBC Today. In honor of her work in arts and entertainment and calling attention to the human trafficking epidemic in Oakland, the mayor of Oakland deemed March 14th as Tracie Collins Day. Her work also extends beyond the birthing room, exploring women's rights and social injustice as an actor, playwright, and producer, working in television and film. 
      
      
    Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in to your body, yourself, and this podcast! Please share the love by sending this to someone in your life who could benefit from the kinds of things we talk about in this space. Make sure to follow your host on Instagram @dr.avivaromm and go to avivaromm.com to join the conversation. Learn more about the National Black Doula’s Association at blackdoulas.org and follow them on Instagram @nationalblackdoulas. 
     

    • 55 min
    Why We Need Birthing Centers

    Why We Need Birthing Centers

    Despite years of evidence about the incredible outcomes, safety, and cost-effectiveness of midwives, midwifery care is still not the standard for pregnancy and birth in the US, and access to birthing centers remains limited. Yet, studies show they are associated with a reduction in cesareans, preterm births, increased breastfeeding success, and an overall positive experience of birth. This is why we need birthing centers and why the work of my guests, visionaries Nashira Baril and Katherine Rushfirth, is critical for creating a sea change in how people birth in this country.  
      
      
    Aviva, Nashira, and Katherine discuss: 
     

    Nashira’s and Katherine’s origin stories into birth work 

    What a birthing center is and how does it differ from home or hospital birth options 

    The advantages of birthing centers and working with a midwife  

    The fact that the birthing center model remains majority white-led and why this needs to change   

    The huge financial savings birth centers put back into the healthcare system 

    How birthing centers are important not just for individuals, but also for building community 

    Advice for people interested in the birthing center experience but who don’t have access to a center  

    Ways you can support the Neighborhood Birth Center as well as other birthing centers 

     
     
    Learn more about the neighborhood birth center and find their video “You Were Welcomed with Love” HERE. 
     
    Nashira Baril, MPH, is the daughter and great-granddaughter of midwives, who midwifed her children at home. Nashira is the founder and executive director of Boston’s Neighborhood Birth Center, the city’s first community birth center, poised to open in 2023. She has a master’s degree in Maternal and Child Health from Boston University School of Public Health and nearly 20 years of experience designing and implementing public health strategies. She has worked at the Boston Public Health Commission, Harvard School of Public Health, and most recently, Human Impact Partners.   
      
    Katherine Rushfirth is a Certified Nurse Midwife and the Policy Director for the forthcoming Neighborhood Birth Center. Katherine was the Associate Chief of Midwifery at Massachusetts General Hospital and among the first midwives to be named faculty at Harvard Medical School. Katherine is a past-president of the MA Affiliate of the American College of Nurse Midwives (ACNM) and currently serves as the Legislative Co-Chair for MA ACNM. Katherine completed her midwifery education at Yale University and her BA in Women’s Studies/Anthropology at Barnard College. " 
     
    Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in to your body, yourself, and this podcast! Please share the love by sending this to someone in your life who could benefit from the kinds of things we talk about in this space. Make sure to follow your host on Instagram @dr.avivaromm and go to avivaromm.com to join the conversation. Follow the Neighborhood Birth Center @neighborhoodbirthcenter. 

    • 1 hr 10 min
    Perfectionism: Healing the Shadow Side

    Perfectionism: Healing the Shadow Side

    Perfectionism. It's a common relentless inner stress that I know I'm not alone in experiencing. What you might not realize is that it's a common symptom of being stuck in mode of survival mode. In this episode I invite you to reframe Perfectionism, along with being a "Good Girl" and other traits of survival mode that can be causing us stress without our even knowing it, and take a deep dive into how we can understand our Superpowers and Shadow Sides to create a more peaceful, balanced life. 
     
     
    Join me as I share: 
     

    My personal experience with Perfectionism and how one of my patients shifted my perspective 

    The potential health consequences of Perfectionism 

    The meaning behind "hungry ghosts" and why you may be holding on to your past 

    Symptoms that suggest you may be struggling with Perfectionism 

    Seven simple practices to help shift out of Perfectionism 


     
    For the accompanying article, visit avivaromm.com/perfectionism-adrenal-overdrive/ 
     
     
    Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in to your body, yourself, and this podcast! Please share the love by sending this to someone in your life who could benefit from the kinds of things we talk about in this space. Make sure to follow your host on Instagram @dr.avivaromm and go to avivaromm.com to join the conversation. 

    • 1 hr 1 min
    Vaginal Seeding After Cesarean: Is It Safe and Recommended for Your Baby?

    Vaginal Seeding After Cesarean: Is It Safe and Recommended for Your Baby?

    Curious about vaginal seeding and whether it is safe and recommended for you and your baby? To date, more than 20 studies have found that the microbiome in cesarean-born babes is different than that of vaginally born infants. These differences can persist to 4 years of age and may pose lasting health consequences. I know this may sound scary but I have some great news to share: researchers and microbiologists are exploring solutions to help increase the health outcomes for mothers and babies through a technique they named Vaginal Seeding, which can be used following a cesarean. This is ground-breaking and pivotal research as the number of cesareans continues to rise on a global level. Tune in to today’s episode to learn what vaginal seeding is, the current research supporting the technique, the potential benefits and risks of vaginal seeding, and ways you can support the newborn microbiome.

    Let’s explore this further. For the accompanying article, go to avivaromm.com/vaginal-seeding-after-cesarean/. 
     
    Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in to your body, yourself, and this podcast! Please share the love by sending this to someone in your life who could benefit from the kinds of things we talk about in this space. Make sure to follow your host on Instagram @dr.avivaromm and go to avivaromm.com to join the conversation. 

    • 40 min
    Too Many Cesarean Sections: What You Need to Know

    Too Many Cesarean Sections: What You Need to Know

    We are facing what continues to be a global cesarean section crisis. The overuse of cesarean sections, especially in the United States, is not new, but it has continued to become more prevalent here and globally over the past 30 years. Joining me this week is obstetrician/gynecologist and world leader in women's reproductive rights, Marleen Temmerman, MD. Listen in as we talk about the dual problem of both the overuse and under-access of cesarean sections for women around the world, and the impact of both of these on women’s health and safety. I know you'll be as moved and inspired as I am hearing Dr. Temmerman's story and important research findings.  
      

    Aviva and Marleen discuss:  
      

    The why's behind the overuse and increase of cesareans  

    Misconceptions about cesarean sections, natural births, and breeches   

    The importance and role of midwives and why every birthing person needs one   

    The various impacts and long-term effects of cesareans on babies  

    Tools available to reduce the number of cesarean sections  

    The ways women can advocate for themselves during childbirth and prevent unnecessary cesareans   

     
      
    Dr. Marleen Temmerman has served as a senator in the Belgian parliament, as the director of the World Health Organization's Department of Reproductive Health and Research, and as the founding director of Ghent University's International Centre of Reproductive Health. After retiring from the WHO, she moved to Kenya, where she is now with the Aga Khan University in Nairobi and is Director of their Centre of Excellence in Women and Child Health. Most recently, she has played a pivotal role in bringing attention to the overuse and under-access of cesarean sections to the obstetrics world internationally as senior author of a series of focus articles published in The Lancet, one of the world's oldest and most respected medical journals. " 
     

    Thank you so much for taking the time to tune in to your body, yourself, and this podcast! Please share the love by sending this to someone in your life who could benefit from the kinds of things we talk about in this space. Make sure to follow your host on Instagram @dr.avivaromm and go to avivaromm.com to join the conversation. 

    • 54 min

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
1.2K Ratings

1.2K Ratings

Lamisje ,

So inspiring!

I love your podcast Dr. Aviva, it inspires me to apply to medical school and become a functional medicine doctor that looks at the root causes of medical conditions and help as many people as I can.

Thank you!

Laly

Smmmmmf ,

Thank you, Aviva!

Anyone who has female parts or knows someone who does should listen to this show :)

LindsayL7 ,

Love this podcast!

Dr. Aviva, thank you so much for your work. You make vital health information available and easily accessible. This is such an interesting podcast.

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