4 episodes

Dig into the hidden history of television with Vox's critic-at-large, Todd VanDerWerff. Each season, we explore the tragic, comedic, and occasionally world-changing stories that have marked a medium that's dominated the global conversation for the last 75 years. First up: TV's relationship with the presidency, featuring deep dives into The West Wing, 24, Veep, and more. Produced by Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.

Primetime Vox

    • TV & Film
    • 4.7, 29 Ratings

Dig into the hidden history of television with Vox's critic-at-large, Todd VanDerWerff. Each season, we explore the tragic, comedic, and occasionally world-changing stories that have marked a medium that's dominated the global conversation for the last 75 years. First up: TV's relationship with the presidency, featuring deep dives into The West Wing, 24, Veep, and more. Produced by Vox and the Vox Media Podcast Network.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
29 Ratings

29 Ratings

jayfug ,

Strong work, thoughtful and entertaining

A fun, insightful, succinct dive into how TV shapes our world. The first episode, on the West Wing and views of the presidency, was particularly strong in examining how the show fit in context with the times, including an important critique of what it missed and ignored. Worth your time, and on my “listen immediately” podcast list.

PRProf-DFW ,

Interesting Angle!

Enjoyed first episode and look forward to listening to the one focused on “24.” Can’t wait to see additional ones looking at “Designated Survivor,” “House of Cards,” “Scandal” (Olivia Pope = Michael Cohen?), “The Good Wife,” “Veep” and “Madam Secretary” and on and on and on. Thanks!

SH3rm17 ,

Another great podcast from Todd VanDerWerff

I found Todd’s previous podcast (I Think You’re Interesting) not long before it ended. I was an instant fan, and I have sorely missed it. I enjoy reading Todd’s work on Vox, but it was a delight to listen in on his insightful interviews and extended musings on the podcast. Todd is a true TV fan, with a somewhat unique perspective compared to other TV critics, as he discovered many shows at a later age due to a stricter than typical religious upbringing. Possibly as a result, his observations are more nuanced and less colored by childhood and adolescent nostalgia than most, and his analysis is deeply conscious of how TV shows relate to and reflect the culture of their time. This new podcast seems a perfect fit for Mr. VanDerWerff, and I am excited to add it to my podcast queue!

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