10 episodes

The sign above his hospital bed called him Sixty-Six Garage. For more than 15 years, he would lay there unidentified and unconscious. Or so, everyone believed. From L.A. Times Studios and the team that brought you “Dirty John” and “Man in the Window,” comes “Room 20,” a story about the search for a man’s identity and the truth about his accident. Investigative reporter Joanne Faryon’s two-year journey is filled with twists and turns. Now, she'll finally reveal who Garage really is. But one important question remained for her upon this discovery: has Garage been conscious this entire time? This series was produced by L.A. Times Studios with support from Neon Hum Media.

Room 20 Wondery

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.2, 4.2K Ratings

The sign above his hospital bed called him Sixty-Six Garage. For more than 15 years, he would lay there unidentified and unconscious. Or so, everyone believed. From L.A. Times Studios and the team that brought you “Dirty John” and “Man in the Window,” comes “Room 20,” a story about the search for a man’s identity and the truth about his accident. Investigative reporter Joanne Faryon’s two-year journey is filled with twists and turns. Now, she'll finally reveal who Garage really is. But one important question remained for her upon this discovery: has Garage been conscious this entire time? This series was produced by L.A. Times Studios with support from Neon Hum Media.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
4.2K Ratings

4.2K Ratings

106lane ,

106lane

I couldn’t stop listening to your podcast. I found it both sad and hopeful, I can’t imagine begin trapped in my body and I couldn’t let anyone know I’m still in help😢😢💔

(yomo) ,

Too much

Couldn’t get past the first episode because I realized it’s another podcast about the narrators experience rather than the actual story. Pass.

Fah-q Obama ,

Well....

Listened to all the episodes in a night...my takeaways:
1) Narrator solved a John Doe case but it felt disingenuous as this was the ONLY objective focus.
2) Narrator demonizes the people enforcing US laws (border patrol).
3) Instead of calling it what it is: illegal immigration, the narrator uses “undocumented immigrants” to describe the subjects. Narrator goes out of her way to point out how “interviewees” describe them as “illegals”, I question her implication.
4) Given his condition, Doe’s sister sounded surprised (almost disappointed) they kept her brother alive. It felt like his sister had written him off long ago.

Best part of the Podcast was the narrator’s tenacity which led to tracking down Doe’s identity; beyond that it felt politically charged.

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