12 episodes

Keep on rollin', baby. It's a monthly podcast where Bryan Quinby (Street Fight Radio) and John Cullen (Blocked Party) dissect a classic nu-metal album and wonder why they just can't give up thinking nu-metal is good. Probably because it really, really is.

The P.O.D. Kast Bryan Quinby & John Cullen

    • Comedy
    • 5.0, 59 Ratings

Keep on rollin', baby. It's a monthly podcast where Bryan Quinby (Street Fight Radio) and John Cullen (Blocked Party) dissect a classic nu-metal album and wonder why they just can't give up thinking nu-metal is good. Probably because it really, really is.

    Static-X's Wisconsin Death Trip, or The Masked Singer

    Static-X's Wisconsin Death Trip, or The Masked Singer

    One of the most iconic figures in nu-metal, Wayne Static, is almost more of the focus of this episode than the band is, as we look into Static-X's start as a band, Wayne's eventual death, and the band's decision to dress Edsel Dope up in a Wayne mask and go on a 20th Anniversary Tour of this album. It's the first album we've reviewed from the side of nu-metal that also held a pretty large industrial influence, and both Bryan and John explain that it was one that largely passed them by at the time but one they are excited to revisit.
     
    In a continuing series where Bryan Quinby (Street Fight Radio) and John Cullen (Blocked Party) review one classic nu-metal album per month, Static-X comes in from a listener donation, and for John at least, it feels like the only way this would've ever gotten a review from the P.O.D. boys. But Bryan and John are game for it, as the album shows some flashes of what Static-X could have been, were they not so focused on "evil disco" and building tracks strictly from the drums and programming up. And the weird legacy of the band proves almost more interesting, as the in-fighting over the name, Wayne Static's drug problems, and the introduction of Xer0 make them a more fascinating tale than most. Plus, we find some time to talk about Korn's cover of "Devil Went Down to Georgia" going viral and Corey Taylor's new solo project.
     
    If you want a fun solo project, you can take some alone time and use it to donate to the show at https://patreon.com/thepodkast, where $4/month gets you a bonus episode every single month. Last month, we had the wonderful Jordan Uhl on to discuss Strait Up, the tribute album to the deceased lead singer of the band Snot which features nearly all of nu-metal's greatest singers, and we've got another great episode coming this month as we tackle the Queen of the Damned soundtrack. Plus you get access to all of our back catalogue of bonus episodes and there's new stuff coming every month. Donate now!

    • 1 hr 48 min
    Disturbed's The Sickness, or Nu Metal's Triple Major

    Disturbed's The Sickness, or Nu Metal's Triple Major

    An album that Bryan describes as "elevator music, but nu-metal", Disturbed kicks off a bafflingly successful career with this, their debut album, "The Sickness". An album that brought the world "ooh-wah-ah-ah-ah" and launched a thousand nu-metal jokes, Disturbed created the blueprint for how a band that originally came up in nu-metal could be successful well past the genre's expiration date. All the foundations of Disturbed are here, from David Draiman's weird rap-sing style to the chugga-chugga of every single song, as one bleeds into the next and we go deep into all of it.
     
    In a continuing series where Bryan Quinby (Street Fight Radio) and John Cullen (Blocked Party) review one classic nu-metal album per month, this is an album that pitches straight down the middle. You know what you're going to get from the outset, with weird, very specific lyrics that turn out to be mostly made up, to the cover of an 80s new wave song designed to move copies. And move copies this album did, as it's gone five times platinum since its release and continues to be one of the pillars of the genre. Plus, we learn who David Draiman is as a guy, and guess what? He's not great. Shocker, we know. From describing how smart he is in nearly every interview (a triple major, baby!) to our most fun Challenge ever, we dissect just who this guy is, and how he came to front one of the most popular metal bands ever. 
     
    If you want to feel smart and popular, you can donate to the show at https://patreon.com/thepodkast, where $4 a month gets you access to a shiny bonus episode every single month, and access to our entire back catalogue as well. We're fresh off reviewing WWF's Forceable Entry with Stop Podcasting Yourself's Graham Clark, and past guests include Molly Lambert, Nick Wiger, and Felix Biederman. This month, we've got the review of Strait Up, the Snot-led tribute to their deceased lead singer Lynn Strait, which features the band fronted by a bunch of nu-metal singers and it's extremely underrated. It's gonna be a great one and you don't wanna miss out on all the times Bryan and John get together to talk nu. Donate today!

    • 1 hr 51 min
    Kittie's Spit w/ Fallon Bowman of Kittie

    Kittie's Spit w/ Fallon Bowman of Kittie

    We are extremely pleased to be joined by Fallon Bowman, one of the founding members of Kittie, to discuss their debut album, "Spit". We said we would never have a guest on the main episodes of the program, but this is Fallon Bowman! We have no choice. She rules.
     
    In a continuing series where Bryan Quinby (Street Fight Radio) and John Cullen (Blocked Party) review one classic nu-metal album per month, we revisit one of the formative nu-metal albums from John's childhood, Spit. Kittie, one of the best all-female groups of all-time is also Canadian, so John heard them a ton growing up, and Bryan gets his first exposure to a band that he calls "a perfect nu-metal sound". We discuss how John was super afraid of Kittie as a young teen, why "Brackish" would be the song Bryan would choose if someone asked him what nu-metal is, and just what made this small group of 4 Canadian women so special. And then to top it off, we are joined by Fallon Bowman to talk about how Kittie wrote the majority of this record as 14 year-olds, what it was like to tour with Ozzfest and be firmly entrenched in this genre as young women, and ultimately, why Fallon left the band before their second record was even written. Plus, we share a lot of laughs, as the interview goes double the time it was supposed to. It starts at 48:22.
     
    If you want to go double the time with us, you can donate to the show at https://patreon.com/thepodkast, where $4 a month gets you access to another helping of P.O.D. Kast goodness. One regular episode not enough? We got you covered. We do one bonus episode per month, and each bonus episode is a review of a compilation album or a nu-metal-adjacent album. In May, we had Felix Biederman from Chapo Trap House on to discuss Everlast's long-winded "Whitey Ford Sings the Blues". This month, for the first time ever, we plan to let YOU decide which nu-metal compilation we review, and we'll have another great guest along for the ride. $4 and you get those episodes, plus our whole back catalogue of nu-metal goodness. Get into it.

    • 1 hr 58 min
    Puddle of Mudd's Come Clean, or the Tao of Wes Scantlin

    Puddle of Mudd's Come Clean, or the Tao of Wes Scantlin

    We've finally arrived at a pivotal moment in the show's history: an album both hosts absolutely despise. After Bryan rigged the show poll to get a convincing win for Puddle of Mudd after Kittie was hours away from victory, he reaps what he sows as he ends up misremembering the album as good and discovers that in the year of our lord 2020, the band Puddle of Mudd is very, very bad.
    In a continuing series where Bryan Quinby (Street Fight Radio) and John Cullen (Blocked Party) review one classic nu-metal album per month, the target this month is fairly big, as Come Clean is baffling from many angles: the lyrics, the songwriting, what genre it really belongs to, what era it was recorded in, and just how someone like Wes Scantlin managed to front a successful band. The fellas look at how this album managed to get popular despite all of these shortcomings, including Wes' own hometown of Kansas City essentially disowning him, him publicly insulting Fred Durst despite Fred being the one to break them, and a lead single where the song trails out with Wes Scantlin singing how he loves the way his girl smacks his ass. Plus, this month's Challenge gets personal as Bryan and John rewrite "She Hates Me" to include verses about their significant others.
    If you want to be loved in the same way as our significant others, you can donate to the show at https://patreon.com/thepodkast, where $4/month gets you access to a shiny new bonus bauble every month! We've done four bonus episodes so far with some fantastic guests like Nick Wiger of Doughboys, Molly Lambert of Nightcall, and Keith Buckley of Every Time I Die, and this month, we have Felix Biederman from Chapo Trap House joining us to discuss Everlast's Whitey Ford Sings the Blues. It's gonna be a good one, folks. Hop on board!

    • 1 hr 56 min
    Incubus' S.C.I.E.N.C.E., or Californians Gone Wild

    Incubus' S.C.I.E.N.C.E., or Californians Gone Wild

    Incubus is what happens when you take 5 guys from California, give them a bunch of mushrooms and a major-label deal before they're 22 years old, and ask them to make a debut album for the masses. Given where the band ended up, it's a bit wild to listen to their major label debut, S.C.I.E.N.C.E., a record that has more in common with Primus and Red Hot Chili Peppers than it does Korn or Limp Bizkit.
    Join Street Fight Radio's Bryan Quinby and Blocked Party's John Cullen for this month's classic nu-metal album review, an album that some might not agree is nu-metal but that saw them tour with a ton of your favourite nu-metal bands and get categorized as such early on (for the record, we think it is, but it's their only one). We deal with all this album has to offer, from the bizarre cover art to the insane lyrics of lead singer Brandon Boyd, who had his shirt off more than he had it on and managed to date a string of supermodels despite singing songs about living in space and aliens probing his butthole. The boys also engage in another initials version of The Challenge, and get surprised at how much they enjoyed revisiting this album, which has held up almost as well as anything else in the nu-metal oeuvre.
    Do you know what oeuvre means? Us neither. But if you want to learn more about a subject we do know lots about, you can subscribe to our bonus content at https://patreon.com/thepodkast, where just a meagre $4 gets you access to a bonus episode every month! Last month, we had the fantastic Nick Wiger from The Doughboys join us to dissect Korn's first "documentary", "Who Then Now?" from back in 1997. It was uhh, not good, but we had a ton of fun talking about it with Nick, who told us after the recording that he was drunk but we couldn't tell! It was great. This month, we have another HUGE guest for you, as we continue to find people who loved nu-metal and are itching to talk about it. Get on board!

    • 1 hr 43 min
    P.O.D.'s Satellite, or Not Christian Rock, but Rock from Guys Who Love Jesus

    P.O.D.'s Satellite, or Not Christian Rock, but Rock from Guys Who Love Jesus

    It took us 7 episodes, but we finally get down to the band who gave us our name: Payable on Death, or as you know them, P.O.D. Another album that bafflingly sold 6 million copies, overcoming its release on September 11th, 2001 and its reputation, being Christian Rock in a time where that wasn't cool, to become one of the best-selling nu-metal albums of all-time. 
    Street Fight Radio's Bryan Quinby and Blocked Party's John Cullen sit down once again to review a classic nu-metal album as part of their monthly series about the genre. The boys take a long look at their own history with religion, their history with this album, and dissect some of the worst songs of the nu-metal era, from the shameless pandering of "Youth of the Nation" to the weird reggae crossovers to one of the worst utilizations of a guest feature ever as H.R. from Bad Brains gets subjected to whatever the hell that song is. It's an album that could've only existed in 2001, and despite it being our namesake...we don't really like it.
    Something we do like is doing one bonus episode every month on our Patreon. You can contribute at https://patreon.com/thepodkast, where $4 a month gets you access to that bonus episode. Last month, we had Keith Buckley, lead singer of Every Time I Die, join us to discuss the Ozzfest 2001 live album, and this month, we have another very special bonus episode with a very special guest. Join us on this journey back into the nu-metal abyss.

    • 1 hr 45 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
59 Ratings

59 Ratings

Podchats ,

Brave Nu World

Literally downloaded Kittie because of it. That’s a pretty good review. Could also hear them talk about Disturbed all day. Now please review Angel Dust!

Kevin 787 ,

Awesome!!

Great podcast with awesome content. Love to see P.O.D satellite reviewed or Fundamental elements of Southtown

carruste ,

Good stuff

The only problem with this show is that I have to keep pausing it to listen to whatever album they’re talking about. They make each song sound so good

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