106 episodes

Inspiring and thought-provoking conversations with leading thinkers about influential ideas on business, technology, economics, and science. Hosted by Martin Reeves, Chairman of the BCG Henderson Institute, and Philipp Carlsson-Szlezak, Global Chief Economist of BCG.

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Thinkers & Ideas BCG Henderson Institute

    • Business
    • 4.7 • 31 Ratings

Inspiring and thought-provoking conversations with leading thinkers about influential ideas on business, technology, economics, and science. Hosted by Martin Reeves, Chairman of the BCG Henderson Institute, and Philipp Carlsson-Szlezak, Global Chief Economist of BCG.

For more ideas and inspiration, sign up to receive BHI INSIGHTS, our monthly newsletter, and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter.

This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    Look Again with Cass Sunstein

    Look Again with Cass Sunstein

    In Look Again: The Power of Noticing What Was Always There, Cass Sunstein, together with his co-author Tali Sharot, discusses the importance of reevaluating the familiar to discover new insights.
    Sunstein has long been at the forefront of behavioral economics. He is the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard Law School and served as the administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in the Obama administration. He has authored numerous best sellers, such as Nudge and The World According to Star Wars., In his new book, he explores the effects of habituation—ceasing to notice the familiar.
    Together with Martin Reeves, Chairman of the BCG Henderson Institute, Sunstein discusses the perils of habituation and how to see the unseen. He also identifies ways that company leaders can strategically avoid habituation to ensure their organizations do not get stuck in mental models that limit adaptability to new trends and challenges.
    Key topics discussed: 
    01:09 | How habituation works
    04:25 | What dishabituation is
    08:18 | How to see the unseen
    13:51 | How corporations should think about (dis-)habituation
    22:08 | Breaking free from a mental model
    24:21 | Personal strategies for dishabituation
    Additional inspirations from Cass Sunstein:
    Noise: A Flaw in Human Judgment; co-authored by Daniel Kahneman and Olivier Sibony (Little Brown Spark, 2021)The World According to Star Wars (Dey Street Books, 2016)Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness; co-authored by Richard Thaler (Penguin Books, 2009)


    This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

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    • 31 min
    Why We Die with Venki Ramakrishnan

    Why We Die with Venki Ramakrishnan

    In Why We Die: The New Science of Ageing and the Quest for Immortality, Venki Ramakrishnan explores the current research on and prospects for human longevity.
    Ramakrishnan leads a group at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England. For his research on the structure and function of ribosomes, he won the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. From 2015 to 2020, he served as president of the Royal Society. In his new book, Ramakrishnan explains the mechanisms of aging and their potential impacts on life expectancy, health span, and lifespan.
    Together with Martin Reeves, Chairman of the BCG Henderson Institute, Ramakrishnan discusses the likely social, economic, and ethical implications of increasing longevity as well as the specific efforts researchers are making to prolong healthy life—and how close they are to achieving a breakthrough. He shines a light on a set of technologies which could be every bit as impactful as artificial intelligence, which therefore also deserve our attention.
    Key topics discussed: 
    02:28 | Life expectancy vs. health span vs. maximum lifespan
    08:21 | Mechanisms of aging
    13:25 | Potential interventions for promoting longevity
    18:27 | How close are we to a longevity breakthrough?
    24:02 | Societal and ethical implications
    28:48 | The art of communicating complex idea
    Additional inspirations from Venki Ramakrishnan:
    The Most Promising Ways to Stop Ageing (New Scientist Interview, 2024)The Story of Deciphering the Ribosome (The Royal Society Talk, 2020)Gene Machine: The Race to Decipher the Secrets of the Ribosome (Basic Books, 2018)


    This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

    Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    • 31 min
    Making Sense of Chaos with Doyne Farmer

    Making Sense of Chaos with Doyne Farmer

    In Making Sense of Chaos: A better economics for a better world, J. Doyne Farmer challenges traditional economic models, which rely on simplistic assumptions and fail to provide accurate predictions.
    Farmer, a complex systems scientist at the University of Oxford and the Santa Fe Institute, argues that with technological advances in data science and computing, we are now able to apply complex systems thinking to build models that more accurately capture reality and enable us to make better predictions about the economy.
    Together with Martin Reeves, Chairman of the BCG Henderson Institute, Farmer discusses the limitations of standard models of economics as well as the consequences of such limitations. He proposes an alternative based on complex systems thinking and agent-based modeling—and describes how it can be applied in various fields, including business.
    Key topics discussed: 
    01:42 | Limitations of the standard model of economics
    04:44 | How complex systems thinking works
    09:01 | Consequences of using inadequate economic models
    12:44 | Agent-based modeling as a powerful alternative
    19:02 | Leveraging alternative modeling techniques in business
    24:59 | How CEOs can start embracing complexity thinking


    This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

    Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    • 30 min
    Co-Intelligence with Ethan Mollick

    Co-Intelligence with Ethan Mollick

    In Co-Intelligence: Living and Working with AI, Ethan Mollick explains how to engage with AI as a co-worker, a co-teacher, and a coach.
    Mollick is a professor of management at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, where he studies and teaches innovation and entrepreneurship. In his new book, he discusses the profound impacts AI will have on business and education, using many examples of AI in action. His book challenges us to utilize AI’s enormous power without losing our human identity, to learn from it without being misled, and to harness its gifts to create a better human future.
    Together with Martin Reeves, chairman of the BCG Henderson Institute, Mollick discusses how to train people to use AI effectively, whether AI will substitute or complement workers, and how businesses can move beyond a short-term efficiency gains perspective to generate value with AI in the long term.
     Key topics discussed: 
    02:27 | The four rules for living with AI
    09:04 | Educating people to use AI effectively
    10:47 | What experiments reveal about where AI adds (and destroys) value at work
    12:45 | Substituting (vs. complementing) workers with AI
    14:14 | Generating value with AI in the long-term
    17:10 | Bringing about the social change in organizations alongside the tech change
    20:48 | AI regulation
    27:18 | How AI will transform education
    Additional inspirations from Ethan Mollick:
    One Useful Thing (Substack)The Unicorn’s Shadow: Combating the Dangerous Myths That Hold Back Startups, Founders, and Investors (Wharton School Press, 2020)Changing the Game: How Video Games Are Transforming the Future of Business - Co-authored by David Edery (FT Press, 2008)


    This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

    Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    • 32 min
    The Intelligence of Intuition with Gerd Gigerenzer

    The Intelligence of Intuition with Gerd Gigerenzer

    In The Intelligence of Intuition, Gerd Gigerenzer challenges a commonly held view of intuition—namely, that it is somehow inferior to logical rationality.
    Gigerenzer is director of the Harding Center for Risk Literacy at the University of Potsdam, director emeritus of the Center for Adaptive Behavior and Cognition at the Max Planck Institute for Human Development, and an expert on human decision-making. He argues that intuition is a form of unconscious intelligence shaped experience and evolution in dealing with uncertain and dynamic situations—situations for which logic and algorithms are often ill-fitted. As leaders deal with uncertainty and complexity and embrace new AI technologies, they must not forget the power of intuition.
    Together with Martin Reeves, Chairman of the BCG Henderson Institute, Gigerenzer explores the power of intuition, when to use it in business, and how to cultivate and employ it.
    Key topics discussed: 
    01:23 | Difference between intuition and rationality
    04:49 | Role of heuristics
    06:29 | Why intuition is often looked down upon
    08:06 | Power of intuition
    15:21 | How to use intuition in business
    18:45 | Distinguishing right intuition from wrong intuition
    25:12 | Considering how AI use intuition
    Additional inspirations from Gerd Gigerenzer:
    How to Stay Smart in a Smart World: Why Human Intelligence Still Beats Algorithms (The MIT Press, 2022)Gut Feelings: The Intelligence of the Unconscious (Penguin Books, 2008)Calculated Risks: How to Know When Numbers Deceive You (Simon & Schuster, 2003)


    This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

    Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    • 30 min
    Climate Capitalism with Akshat Rathi

    Climate Capitalism with Akshat Rathi

    In Climate Capitalism: Winning the Global Race to Zero Emissions, Akshat Rathi tells the stories of people around the world who are building impactful solutions to tackle climate change.
    Rathi is a senior reporter for Bloomberg News, focusing on climate and energy. He also hosts the weekly Zero podcast, in which he talks to the people leading the fight for a zero-emissions future. In his new book, Rathi argues that the best way to cut carbon pollution is by harnessing capitalism. Combating climate change requires a combination of smart policies, financing, technological innovations, and leadership—without killing markets or competition.
    Together with Martin Reeves, Chairman of the BCG Henderson Institute, Rathi discusses the essence of climate capitalism, how to scale up individual success stories, and how to navigate the challenging political context.
     Key topics discussed: 
    02:09 | Definition of climate capitalism
    07:19 | Success stories: Chinese EVs, Orsted
    11:31 | The need to combine tech, policies, and finance
    12:52 | How to scale case studies to big solutions
    16:24 | Navigating a polarized political context
    18:45 | Making climate solutions profitable
    24:06 | Where CEOs should start


    This podcast uses the following third-party services for analysis:

    Chartable - https://chartable.com/privacy

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
31 Ratings

31 Ratings

Dastorino ,

One of the best

This podcast is one of the best at addressing the biggest issues shaping businesses and the world. Low key approach but expertly done. Martin Reeves is a top notch interviewer.

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