300 episodes

Each week scholars explore the worlds of literature, science, the arts, politics, history, religion, and business through lively discussion with host Sarah McConnell. From the controversies over slave reparations and global warming, to the unique worlds of comic books and wine-making, With Good Reason is always surprising, challenging and fun!

With Good Reason Virginia Humanities

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.7, 27 Ratings

Each week scholars explore the worlds of literature, science, the arts, politics, history, religion, and business through lively discussion with host Sarah McConnell. From the controversies over slave reparations and global warming, to the unique worlds of comic books and wine-making, With Good Reason is always surprising, challenging and fun!

    No One Cares Alone

    No One Cares Alone

    Sammy was just a month old when he started experiencing symptoms of heart failure. Dr. Mark Roeser helped perform the groundbreaking surgery that saved the boy’s life. And: Burnout is especially prevalent in the medical field. And Dr. Mark Greenawald should know, he felt its devastating effects after a patient of his died tragically while giving birth. Earlier this year, he created PeerRxMed to help health care workers identify and overcome burnout.

    Later in the show: Domestic violence has been on the rise since the onset of the pandemic. Jhumka Gupta says that’s because stay at home orders have isolated women with abusive partners. Plus: Getting facetime with a doctor can be tough--they’re often overbooked and expensive. The problem is even worse in rural areas, where there’s a shortage of doctors. Erika Metzler Sawin runs a program called UPCARE, placing RNs in rural communities to help fill the gap and get more care to more people.

    • 52 min
    The Chiefest Town

    The Chiefest Town

    At the confluence of the James and Rivana Rivers in Virginia sits a Monacan site. Monacan Chief Kenneth Branham walks us through the site of what was once the village of Rassawek, the epicenter of Monacan life before the Europeans arrived. And: Martin Gallivan, author of James River Chiefdoms and Jeffery L. Hantman, author of Monacan Millennium, say there is no doubt that Rassawek is the site of the former Monocan capital.

    Later in the show: For a decade, now, Amy Clark has been probing family land to make sense of ghost stories. A cemetery of enslaved people punctuates the family homestead. Now she’s troubling myths of Appalachia to make the ground talk. Plus: William Isom II is the director of Black in Appalachia. His work with Amy Clark led to his discovery in Tennessee of the grave of his great, great grandfather.

    • 52 min
    Summer Streaming Hour

    Summer Streaming Hour

    After months at home, your streaming watchlists are probably exhausted. With Good Reason is here to the rescue! We’re bringing you summer streaming recommendations from scholars and artists. Myles McNutt charts Netflix’s rise to video streaming juggernaut and recommends a miniseries on the systemic failures in sexual assault investigations. And: Yossera Bouchtia suggests two TV shows grappling with race and identity in America.

    Later in the show: White actors have recently been stepping down from voicing characters of color. Shilpa Davé explains the harmful stereotype she calls “brown voice” and recommends a Netflix show that captures the Indian-American coming of age experience. Plus: Tanya Stadelmann shares two films that document the journey to environmental activism.

    • 52 min
    Presenting: Transcripts

    Presenting: Transcripts

    Even though transgender-themed TV shows like Transparent and Pose have achieved mainstream popularity, trans people still face huge barriers to employment, housing, and safety. In fact, many trans people of color say that their lives are harder than ever before. Transcripts, a new podcast hosted by Myrl Beam and Andrea Jenkins, investigates how trans activists are trying to change that.

    Later in the show: The Global Encyclopedia of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer History tackles wide-ranging topics, including masculinity in Iranian cinema and crossdressing in the Middle East. Hanadi Al-Samman coordinated the 56 entries in the encyclopedia connected to the Middle East. Plus: Hate crimes against LGBTQ people have been on the rise since 2012. Liz Coston discusses what these crimes look like and how police and doctors are failing victims.

    • 52 min
    Poetic Justice

    Poetic Justice

    When writer and radio producer Lulu Miller (Invisibilia) discovered she’d have to leave Virginia, she wrote a startling love letter to the state -- one that charges everyday people to stay angry about injustice. A.D. Carson (University of Virginia) uses hip-hop and spoken word to tell hard truths about racist history, cutting through denial with metaphor.

    Later in the show: Tawnya Pettiford-Wates (Virginia Commonwealth University) believes that theatre can heal injustice. She believes it, because she’s seen it happen. Her theatre troupe The Conciliation Project stages plays and dialogues that tackle issues of identity and race in America. Plus: Theatre professor and performer Artisia Green (William & Mary) explains how West African spirituality helps her illuminate new dimensions to familiar plays.

    • 52 min
    Back In Session

    Back In Session

    Colleges all over the country closed campus and shifted to online classes at the start of the coronavirus outbreak. Despite fears of a virus resurgence, Virginia Tech and William & Mary are among a growing number of colleges planning to re-open in the Fall. Katherine Rowe (William & Mary President) and Tim Sands (Virginia Tech President) discuss their plans for keeping students safe and how the institution of higher education may be forever changed.

    Later in the show: Student loan numbers have skyrocketed in recent years, but some groups of students are affected more than others. Jason Houle (Dartmouth College) explains how the burden of student debt follows the same social divides that much else does: race and class. Plus: Stephanie Cellini (George Washington University) studies the rise and fall of for-profit colleges and universities. She says they often take advantage of the students who are most in need of a leg up.

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5
27 Ratings

27 Ratings

jaypine ,

Gems From the Dessert

With Good Reason finds amazing guests with knowledge, topics and opinions outside of those knocked back and forth by the usual talking heads. With Good Reason combs the desert for gems; people who should be on air but would be otherwise hidden in the sand: Mona Ternus, a veteran of several wars, nurse, and researcher explains how mothers who deploy to war can mitigate the effects on their families. Historian Cindy Wilkey recounts the adventures of the Wright Brothers from the perspective of their sister Katherine, who happenned to be their business manager. Stage and film fight director Greg Lloyd explains that the key to staging a fight scene is in the acting (or "selling") of the vicitm. Unexpected, unique insights.

lrnthedobro ,

conversations for the curious

i've been listening to this show for years! it covers such a wide range of subjects - you never know what you might hear about next but it's always fascinating. the host does a great job of asking the questions i want to hear answered most. great listening. keep up the good work!

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