8 episodes

Millennial Money uses personal stories to help offer relatable, practical advice to others in similar situations. This series aims to shed light on money issues millennials face, but also their success stories, in hopes readers are able to take a bit and pieces for their own life. “As a millennial myself, I never learned about finances,” says Evy Kwong, host of Millennial Money. Financial issues for young people, in a precarious job market and unaffordable housing market, are closely linked to mental health. The series features a new person (or couple) each week. They are real people and situations, but their identities are protected with voice actors, in order to speak freely about what so many consider a very private topic: their finances. While the savings goals vary widely, the scenario for each interviewee is the same: they are asked to record every penny they spend in a typical week. Then, using tips from a financial adviser, they’re challenged to cut their spending the following week so they can save more money.

Millennial Money Toronto Star

    • Business
    • 4.0 • 73 Ratings

Millennial Money uses personal stories to help offer relatable, practical advice to others in similar situations. This series aims to shed light on money issues millennials face, but also their success stories, in hopes readers are able to take a bit and pieces for their own life. “As a millennial myself, I never learned about finances,” says Evy Kwong, host of Millennial Money. Financial issues for young people, in a precarious job market and unaffordable housing market, are closely linked to mental health. The series features a new person (or couple) each week. They are real people and situations, but their identities are protected with voice actors, in order to speak freely about what so many consider a very private topic: their finances. While the savings goals vary widely, the scenario for each interviewee is the same: they are asked to record every penny they spend in a typical week. Then, using tips from a financial adviser, they’re challenged to cut their spending the following week so they can save more money.

    Two jobs, four roommates and $24,000 in student loans, Margaux wants to pay down debt and travel

    Two jobs, four roommates and $24,000 in student loans, Margaux wants to pay down debt and travel

    23-year-old Margaux juggles two jobs, one at a non-profit and one part-time as a server, working 50 to 60 hours a week. Why the grind? She has $24,000 in student debt but also wants to travel. Evy speaks with financial adviser Jason Heath for recommendations.
    All of our participants have been granted anonymity, and so we’ll be using voice actors for their quotes.
    If you would like to support the journalism of the Toronto Star, you can subscribe at thestar.com/subscribingmatters.

    • 9 min
    Single dad, two bedrooms, three kids, $80,000 in debt. How does Rohan take care of his children now and in the future?

    Single dad, two bedrooms, three kids, $80,000 in debt. How does Rohan take care of his children now and in the future?

    Rohan is a 40-year-old single father of three making $80,000 a year in the pharma industry. He is also $80,000 in debt and is struggling to make ends meet. He also has some regrets about his condo in this market and wants help on how to best ensure his kids are taken care of now and well into their futures. Evy speaks with financial adviser Jason Heath for recommendations.

    All of our participants have been granted anonymity, and so we’ll be using voice actors for their quotes.

    • 8 min
    Rent or buy? First, how does this 37-year-old roommate tackle her $10,000 debt?

    Rent or buy? First, how does this 37-year-old roommate tackle her $10,000 debt?

    Lola is 37 and works in the pharma industry in a contract role making $87,000 a year, plus bonuses. She has had roommates for most of her adult life. The problem? She has $10,000 in debt and would like advice whether she should buy or rent a home.
    Evy speaks with financial adviser Jason Heath for recommendations. All of our participants have been granted anonymity, and so we’ll be using voice actors for their quotes.
    If you would like to support the journalism of the Toronto Star, you can subscribe at thestar.com/subscribingmatters.

    • 12 min
    Kids’ education, mortgage, a million-dollar retirement, and an investment property? This 34-year-old health-care worker wants it all

    Kids’ education, mortgage, a million-dollar retirement, and an investment property? This 34-year-old health-care worker wants it all

    Mel, a 34-year-old health-care worker and father of three, makes makes $104,000. He wants to save a minimum of $50,000 for each of his children’s future, pay off his mortgage in the next decade and buy an income property to rent out. He also wants to save a million dollars each for him and his wife’s retirement. What should he do to tackle these goals?
    Evy Kwong speaks with financial advisor Jason Heath for recommendations.
    All of our participants have been granted anonymity, and so we'll be using voice actors for their quotes.
    If you would like to support the journalism of the Toronto Star, you can subscribe at thestar.com/subscribingmatters.

    • 11 min
    Emergency vs. travel fund? Larger home vs. RRSPs? After buying a condo, Nicole wants to know what’s next

    Emergency vs. travel fund? Larger home vs. RRSPs? After buying a condo, Nicole wants to know what’s next

    Nicole makes $78,000 a year as a policy analyst. She just bought her first apartment in downtown Toronto during the pandemic. She saved six figures before she was 30. How? She says living her parents until the age of 27 allowed her to save on housing, food and other costs. Now she wants to know what to do next. Evy speaks with financial advisor Jason Heath for recommendations.
    All of our participants have been granted anonymity, and so we'll be using voice actors for their quotes.
    If you would like to support the journalism of the Toronto Star, you can subscribe at thestar.com/subscribingmatters.

    • 13 min
    How does Kate, 31, invest her savings in order to buy a home and start a nest egg?

    How does Kate, 31, invest her savings in order to buy a home and start a nest egg?

    Kate makes $65,000 a year as a communications specialist at a non-profit. She has no debt and lives in Burlington, Ontario, with her partner. She’s been able to save $70,000 in her TFSA but wants advice on how to maximize returns on those savings so she can get out of her rental, buy a home in the GTA and maybe even save some after the down payment. Evy speaks to with financial advisor Jason Heath for recommendations.
    All of our participants have been granted anonymity, and so we'll be using voice actors for their quotes.
    If you would like to support the journalism of the Toronto Star, you can subscribe at thestar.com/subscribingmatters.

    • 10 min

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5
73 Ratings

73 Ratings

poppy5467 ,

Awkward and rushed

While I’m sure keeping the podcast length between 11-13 minutes has its perks, i think it negatively impacts the quality of the podcast. The voice acting for the subjects isn’t… great, but that’s usually excusable if the host is able to compensate for the lack of personality.

Unfortunately this isn’t the case either. No offense to Evy but it’s just very obvious that she’s reading directly from a script, with no wiggle room for her personality to come through. The lack of phrasing and humour when Evy speaks makes me feel like I’m listening to a fifth grade class presentation. It’s rushed, awkward and feels like both myself and the presenter want it to be over as soon as possible.

tessaaaaas ,

Yawn.

This podcast is basically a rehash of the TV series, Til Debt Do Us Part, rebranded with millennial buzzwords. Unlike Gail Vaz-Oxlade, Evy Kwong is has no background in financial planning and is a poor fit for this project.

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