150 episodes

David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the magazine’s legendary Shouts and Murmurs page. The New Yorker has set a standard in journalism for generations and The New Yorker Radio Hour gives it a voice on public radio for the first time. Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many more.
© WNYC Studios

The New Yorker Radio Hour WNYC

    • News Commentary
    • 4.3, 3K Ratings

David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the magazine’s legendary Shouts and Murmurs page. The New Yorker has set a standard in journalism for generations and The New Yorker Radio Hour gives it a voice on public radio for the first time. Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many more.
© WNYC Studios

    Keeping Released Prisoners Safe and Sane

    Keeping Released Prisoners Safe and Sane

    Starting this spring, many states began releasing some inmates from prisons and jails to try to reduce the spread of COVID-19. But a huge number of incarcerated people are mentally ill or addicted to drugs, or sometimes both. When those people are released, they may lose their only consistent access to treatment. Marianne McCune, a reporter for WNYC, spent weeks following a psychiatrist and a social worker as they tried to locate and then help some recently released patients at a time of uncertainty and chaos. 

    This is a collaboration between The New Yorker Radio Hour and WNYC’s “The United States of Anxiety.”

    • 29 min
    Hilton Als’s Homecoming and the March for Queer Liberation

    Hilton Als’s Homecoming and the March for Queer Liberation

    In the summer of 1967, a young black boy in Brooklyn was shot in the back by a police officer. The writer Hilton Als recalls the two days of “discord and sadness” that followed, and reflects on the connection between those demonstrations and this summer’s uprising following the killing of George Floyd. Plus, an activist group sees an opportunity to reclaim the mantle of gay pride after New York cancels its official parade. 

    • 19 min
    Live at Home Part II: Phoebe Bridgers

    Live at Home Part II: Phoebe Bridgers

    Phoebe Bridgers’s tour dates were cancelled—she was booked at Madison Square Garden, among other venues—so she performs songs from her recent album, “Punisher,” from home. The critic Amanda Petrusich talks about the joys of Folkways records, and the novelist Donald Antrim talks about a year in which he suffered from crippling depression and rarely left his apartment, finding that only music could be a balm for his isolation and fear.

    • 31 min
    Live at Home Part I: John Legend

    Live at Home Part I: John Legend

    Like everyone in the United States, John Legend has spent much of the past three months in lockdown. He has been recording new music (via Zoom), performing on Instagram, and promoting his upcoming album. Though many artists have delayed releasing records until they can schedule concert dates—increasingly the most reliable revenue in the music industry—Legend didn’t want to hold back. The new album, “Bigger Love,” was written before the pandemic and the current groundswell of protest for racial justice, but his message about resilience and faith resonates. All art, Legend tells David Remnick, “is there to help us imagine a different future.”

    • 16 min
    The Supreme Court Weighs the End of DACA

    The Supreme Court Weighs the End of DACA

    This month, the Supreme Court is expected to decide a case with enormous repercussions: the Trump Administration’s cancellation of DACA, a policy that protects young immigrants commonly known as Dreamers. In November, Jonathan Blitzer spoke with two attorneys who argued the case, just before they went before the Court. Ted Olson, a noted litigator, is generally a champion of conservative issues, but he is fighting the Trump Administration here. Luis Cortes is a thirty-one-year-old from Seattle arguing his first Supreme Court case. He is himself an undocumented immigrant protected by DACA; if he loses, his own legal residency would be immediately threatened. Plus, the writer Bryan Washington, a native of Houston, remembers the social life of gay bars before the pandemic.

    • 19 min
    Getting White People to Talk About Racism

    Getting White People to Talk About Racism

    George Floyd’s killing has prompted a national outcry and a wide reassessment of the ways in which racist systems are intrinsic to America. The anti-racism trainer Suzanne Plihcik argues that racism occurs even in the absence of people who seem like racists: “We are set up for it to happen,” she tells Dorothy Wickenden, and changing those systems will require sustained white action. Plus, the political reporter Eric Lach follows a congressional Democratic primary race to learn how the coronavirus pandemic has changed modern campaigning.

    • 30 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
3K Ratings

3K Ratings

LLFauntleroy ,

Covid19 ER Doctor Interview

If you want to hear an unintentionally reassuring podcast this is it. They interview an NYC ER doctor and almost every leading question doesn't pan out for the reporter. Q. I hear you don't have enough respirators, what will you do? A. At first we didn't have enough respirators now we do. Q. I hear you do not have enough masks and garments and gloves? A. At our hospital we do, I keep telling people we don't need them to try to make any for us. Q. I hear at another hospital one worker was wearing a garbage bag. A. Yes I saw that photo in the media,its unfortunate but garbage bags will work If you are temporarily out. Q. I hear you are inundated with 911 calls and can't handle them. A. No it's usually 4000 a day and it's up to 6000 a day now and we're doing it. I guess the reporter didn't have time to go find an ER doctor that would give the doomsday interview he hoped for.

Savageton ,

You see gawd!

Are you kidding me? “You can see gawd!” It seriously creeped me out that you started this episode this way. I quit there.

cool grabdma ,

Tolstoy Together 4/14/20

I enjoyed the discussion very much. The section about living through war or a pandemic while nature and human daily concerns continue, made me think about victims of the Holocaust. They did not know when their emergency would end, while flowers continued to bloom outside the extermination camps.

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