300 episodes

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Business Daily BBC Podcasts

    • Business
    • 4.4 • 461 Ratings

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The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

Listen on Apple Podcasts
Requires subscription and macOS 11.4 or higher

    Business Daily Meets: Pernilla Nyresten

    Business Daily Meets: Pernilla Nyresten

    Pernilla Nyrensten made history when she became the first female founding CEO to float a company on the Stockholm stock exchange since the its inception 160 years ago. She started her retail business, RevolutionRace in 2013 just less than $30,000 today the firm was recently valued at around 1 billion dollars.

    Pernilla's journey has not been without challenges - she's been told, by men, that women should only run hobby businesses and that running a public company is too hard and stressful for women.

    Pernilla tells Sam Fenwick that the sexist comments motivated her to pursue her dream of running a successful retail business, and how she hopes to be a role model for other aspiring female entrepreneurs.

    Presenter / producer: Sam Fenwick
    Image: Pernilla and Niclas; Credit: Pernilla Nyrensten

    • 18 min
    Sweden’s light time economy

    Sweden’s light time economy

    What’s it like to live in permanent daylight for part of the year? Elizabeth Hotson travels around Swedish Lapland to see how one of the most modern economies in the world takes advantage of the twenty four hour summer sun. Elizabeth finds out how a hotel made of ice is kept frozen with solar power, and why the midnight sun is vital to the ancient tradition of reindeer herding in northern Sweden. We also hear how Sweden’s mountain and nature tourism industry developed and why modern businesses like bars and restaurants can capitalise on the never-ending daylight. Plus, we hear from visitors experiencing the midnight sun for the first time.

    Producer: Elizabeth Hotson
    Presenter: Elizabeth Hotson

    Picture Credit: the midnight sun in Sweden via Getty Images

    • 18 min
    The fight for digital privacy

    The fight for digital privacy

    A new breed of tech firms is aiming to revolutionise consumer rights online – making us invisible to advertisers unless they pay us for our data.

    Presenter Ed Butler visits London-based start up Gener8 and speaks to founder Sam Jones. Sam explains how digital marketing works – and what individuals can do to prevent information being collected – or make money from it.

    We also hear from Brendan Eich, co-founder and CEO of US firm Brave, it’s promoting a similar “earn while you browse” model. And it has 25 million active monthly users.

    And, Ed asks, if everyone increases their privacy, what will that do to the modern digital economy?

    Presenter/producer: Ed Butler

    Image: Women in Tokyo looking at phone. Credit: Getty

    • 18 min
    Managing our National Parks

    Managing our National Parks

    Approximately 6% of the Earth’s land surface is covered in National Parks – but what does it take to look after these rare and special landscapes?

    We go beyond the tourist trails to hear about the challenges and opportunities facing the people managing the parks.

    Presenter Laura Heighton-Ginns meets the president of Gorongosa in Mozambique, a park that’s powering the local economy. Gorongosa has become the region’s largest employer and operates a number of side businesses to help with its funding.

    Laura also visits Dartmoor in the South West of England, which has seen government financial support cut by nearly half over the last 10 years.

    And she finds out about the oldest protected area in the world – and why its future is uncertain.

    Presenter/producer Laura Heighton-Ginns.

    Image: Gorongosa National Park. Credit: Gabriela Curtiz / Gorongosa National Park

    • 18 min
    War in Ukraine: Venezuela's oil opportunity?

    War in Ukraine: Venezuela's oil opportunity?

    Russian aggression in Ukraine and the world's quest to end the dependence on Russian oil and gas has created an opportunity for Venezuela to negotiate an easing of the US-imposed oil sanctions. But, as Ivana Davidovic discovers, there are also many pitfalls on that journey.

    Venezuela may have the world's largest oil reserves, but years of underinvestment have severely impacted output, as professor Terry Karl explains.

    Former chairwoman of the refiner Citgo, Luisa Palacios, outlines where Venezuela still manages to sell its oil and the role played by Iran in that trade. She also thinks that a sanctions deal could be made if the Maduro administration is willing to relinquish some control over production.

    But Venezuela expert David Smilde is worried that political, rather than practical, considerations - in the US and Venezuela - might muddy the waters.

    Caracas-based journalist Francis Pena goes on a lengthy journey to buy petrol in her home city, illustrating how economic mismanagement and sanctions are affecting day-to-day lives.

    Presenter/producer: Ivana Davidovic
    Image: A motorcycle passes in front of an oil-themed mural in Caracas, Venezuela. Credit: Javier Campos/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

    • 18 min
    The power of fungi

    The power of fungi

    Tim Hayward takes a journey into the world of fungi. There’s a global wave of interest in the potential uses of fungi right now - and businesses are catching on and playing their part.

    Tim starts at the Fungarium in Kew Gardens, the world’s biggest collection of dried fungal specimens, guided by collections curator Lee Davies. He then heads to a forest in Finland, where chief executive Eric Puro and lab manager Joette Crosier walk him through the setup at Kääpä Biotech - one of a new breed of fungally-focussed companies with big ambitions rooted in a passion for mushrooms and mycelium. Then he talks with Albert Garcia-Romeu, an assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioural sciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Albert is part of a research team looking at the fungally-derived compound psilocybin - about which there’s a huge amount of interest relating to its therapeutic potential.

    Presenter: Tim Hayward
    Producer : Richard Ward.
    Image: Shiitake (Lentinula edodes) mushrooms being cultivated at Kääpä Mushrooms, Karjalohja, Finland. Used with permission.

    Tim’s three-part series about fungi, ‘Fungi: The New Frontier’, is available now on BBC Sounds.

    • 19 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
461 Ratings

461 Ratings

SAARKÉSH ,

Rethinking the Future, PARTIALLY

As a futurist & technologist, I found this episode to offer a half-baked vision of what could be a possible path for humanity without any consideration to the required economical model.
Thank you for your engaging podcast.

PWR WMN ,

The fight for pocket parity

What a nice surprise it was to hear an in depth episode about something that never gets talked about but that all women experience: pocket inequality! We started an entire brand because of this issue and now our company PWR WMN (@pwr_wmn & www.pwrwmn.shop) makes blazers for women with REAL pockets that also celebrate her individuality! Thank you for speaking on this little talked about issue!

Mariann!! ,

Love it!

It’s definitely worth your time if you are trying to stay informed.

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