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Podcast interviews with genius-level (top .1%) practitioners, scientists, researchers, clinicians and professionals in Cancer, 3D Bio Printing, CRISPR-CAS9, Ketogenic Diets, the Microbiome, Extracellular Vesicles, and more.

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Finding Genius Podcast Richard Jacobs

    • Medicine
    • 4.9 • 379 Ratings

Podcast interviews with genius-level (top .1%) practitioners, scientists, researchers, clinicians and professionals in Cancer, 3D Bio Printing, CRISPR-CAS9, Ketogenic Diets, the Microbiome, Extracellular Vesicles, and more.

Subscribe today for the latest medical, health and bioscience insights from geniuses in their field(s).

    Searching for Life in Space and Exploring Space and Time - A Conversation into Theoretical Cosmology with Charley Lineweaver

    Searching for Life in Space and Exploring Space and Time - A Conversation into Theoretical Cosmology with Charley Lineweaver

    Can the human species begin to unravel the cosmic mysteries our planet is surrounded by? Physics may give us a peek behind the curtain of the universe.

    Listen in to learn:
    How humans define life outside of our planet If species can re-evolve Whether extraterrestrial life can be expected to have features similar to humans Associate Professor at The Australian National University, Charley Lineweaver, discusses the possibilities and implications of life outside of our universe.
    To begin understanding the origin of life, we cannot keep the definition tethered to a human's understanding of our lives and history. Opening the constraints allows for an examination of time or life before our species was present.
    By loosening the criteria for a specific trait, species-specific characteristics are removed, which can broaden the possibilities for life. This may open the path to trace all of life back to a single organism.
    For more information, search for Charley Lineweaver on Google or your search engine of choice.

    Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

    • 1 hr
    Cognition as a Necessary Part of Biological Function: Moving Back, to Before the Human-Centric View

    Cognition as a Necessary Part of Biological Function: Moving Back, to Before the Human-Centric View

    “…Science progresses one funeral at a time, and…in another 10 to 20 years, people will look back on this time…and say, what were they thinking?”
    So, what ideas will be in the next coffin of science?
    Tune in for a compelling answer, and to learn:
    How the historical periods before and after behaviorism differ greatly, and impact the way we view cognition today How and where an understanding of cognition and cancer overlap   To what degree an individual cell has freedom in decision-making Dr. Pamela Lyon is a visiting research fellow at Southgate Institute for Health, Society and Equity in Adelaide, Australia. Her research into this topic began as a result of a cross-cultural comparison of philosophical propositions grounded in accounts of the mind.
    Much to her surprise, she discovered that in western cognitive science, cognition has been relegated to the realm of the human brain and machinery (robots, missiles, etc.), without any attention given to the idea of cognition as integral to all biological function.  
    In order for a biological system to persist, it must accomplish so many tasks in terms of physics, chemistry, and its interactions with the environment; it must exchange matter and energy, sense, remember, learn, make decisions in the face of uncertainty and conflicting messages, and value experiences as ‘good’ or ‘bad.’ All of these are cognitive functions.
    “The view I came to is that you can’t stay alive and do what we do in being alive without cognition,” says Lyon, before explaining the history of this view since it emerged around the time of Darwin.
    How did we get to the state we’re in today? What choices have been made about the characterization of cognition, and why?
    Lyon explores her viewpoint with listeners, revitalizing an old yet very pragmatic understanding of all life on Earth.
    Press play for the details of this and more.

    Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

    • 39 min
    Dementia Treatment and Prevention Using New Therapeutic Techniques and Ketones - A Deep Dive with Mary T. Newport

    Dementia Treatment and Prevention Using New Therapeutic Techniques and Ketones - A Deep Dive with Mary T. Newport

                                      Mary T Newport, M.D.
                                       Brief Biography and Links 
    Mary Newport, M.D. was born and raised in Cincinnati, Ohio, graduated from Xavier University (humanities and pre-medicine) and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.  She completed her training in pediatrics at Children’s Hospital Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, and in neonatology at the Medical University Hospital in Charleston, South Carolina, and is board certified in pediatrics and neonatology, the care of sick and premature newborns. She practiced neonatology for thirty years and was founding medical director for two newborn intensive care units in the Tampa Bay area of Florida.  

    More recently, she has gained experience at the opposite end of the spectrum while making home visits to people with a variety of chronic illnesses, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and other dementias and neurological conditions.  In 2008, she implemented a ketogenic nutritional intervention with coconut and medium-chain triglyceride oil that dramatically helped her husband Steve Newport, who had early-onset Alzheimer’s disease.  In 2010, she guided her husband through the first pilot study of the betahydroxybutyrate/butanediol ketone ester in a person with Alzheimer’s and co-authored a case report published in Alzheimer’s and Dementia in 2015 with Dr. Richard Veech and others.

    Her husband lost his battle with Alzheimer’s and Lewy Body dementia in 2016 and Dr. Newport carries on his legacy as an author of three books and international speaker on ketones as an alternative fuel for the brain.  Her latest book is entitled The Complete Book of Ketones: A Practical Guide to Ketogenic Diets and Ketone Supplements.  Dr. Newport is a Certified Ketogenic Nutrition Specialist through the American Society of Nutrition and is currently working on a new book focusing on ketogenic strategies and lifestyle modifications to help prevent or slow down progression of Alzheimer’s and other neurological conditions.  
    Books:
    The Complete Book of Ketones: A Practical Guide to Ketogenic Diets and Ketone Supplements (2019)   
    Amazon Books: https://amzn.to/2AxBcLp 
    The Coconut Oil and Low Carb Solution for Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Other Diseases (2015) 
    Amazon Books: https://amzn.to/2BaClJE 
    Alzheimer’s Disease: What If There Was a Cure?  The Story of Ketones. (2011, 2nd Edition 2013) 
    Amazon Books: https://amzn.to/3d4n0HP


    Can oils found in household cabinets be used in the management of Alzheimer's Disease? Studies may suggest that notable improvements can be gained with consistent use.

    Press play to learn:
    How MTC oil can benefit the brain Why studies involving oil are difficult to conduct How ketones can be converted and used in the body Author Mary T. Newport shares her story of success with treating the effects of early-onset Alzheimer's with MCT and coconut oil.
    Ketones can significantly impact brain function and can be found in oils you may already have lying around your house. As similarly used in newborn baby formula, MCT oil, concentrated from coconut oil, can lead to a sustained improvement in brain function.
    Through anti-inflammatory properties and many other benefits, MCT and coconut oil show promise in deciphering some of the mysteries surrounding dementia. New research is aimed at further delaying cognitive impairment or preventing it altogether.
    For more information, visit coconutketones.com.

    Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

    • 42 min
    Better Sleep and Rise Science with CEO Jeff Kahn

    Better Sleep and Rise Science with CEO Jeff Kahn

    That yawn could be telling you more about your health than you realize. Innovator Jeff Kahn believes lack of quality sleep may be the most underappreciated health concern in society, and his company is working to change that through sleep behavior modification.

    He tells listeners
    Why sleep is the "biggest lever you have in your control," How he ties sleep problems and effective sleep to relationships and solving some of the world's biggest challenges, What's the two-factor model of sleep and wake regulation, and How the Rise Science app for sleep works for technology-enabled sleep behavior. Jeff Kahn is a cofounder and CEO of Rise Science, a company that harnesses technology for better sleep. He studied science, design, and engineering in graduate school and his own struggles with sleep brought him into the university's sleep department; that's where it all began. Since then, research has only increased on the side of the importance of sleep. He shares some of this research with listeners as well as better sleep tips and available resources for more information.
    He explains how the two-factor model of sleep works in terms of our empathy, cognitive abilities, and other skills throughout our waking hours. These factors are known as "sleep debt," or how sleep deprived someone is, and circadian rhythm. The Rise Science app addresses both of these factors, measuring and suggesting modes of improvement.

    He explains how and addresses other sleep issues such as the "sleep hangover," the role of napping, different sleep stages, chemicals released in sleep like adenosine and what it does, and whether it's possible to get too much sleep. Feeling sleepy yet? Well, for some tips about how to address your sleep needs, listen in.

    Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

    • 51 min
    Embryo Genetic Testing and Predispositions to Diseases - An In-Depth conversation with Noor Siddiqui

    Embryo Genetic Testing and Predispositions to Diseases - An In-Depth conversation with Noor Siddiqui

    How can you ensure the health of a baby before even considering conception? Saliva can hold many answers and insights into a child's future.

    Listen in to learn: 
    If a predisposition is the same as a diagnosis The aspects which can be determined about the health of a child before they are born If certain predispositions are more common than others CEO and founder of Orchid Health, Noor Siddiqui, stops by to share her experience in preimplantation genetic testing.
    Understanding genetic risk can drastically impact one's lifestyle or choices and may change the course of any possible ailments. Testing before a child is conceived gives the best chance of mitigating risk.
    Many parents are motivated to help their children avoid suffering from similar conditions they have dealt with during their lives. By enabling parents to be more confident in limiting as many risk factors as possible, more couples can feel able to have their children with a renewed peace of mind.
    To learn more, visit orchidhealth.com.

    Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

    • 29 min
    A Cancer Cell's Advantage: Evolutionary Forces and Cancer Therapy

    A Cancer Cell's Advantage: Evolutionary Forces and Cancer Therapy

    "A tumor grows out of what's, at default, a state of cooperation," says researcher Carlo Maley. His research interest centers on the intersection of cancer and evolution and ways to use that understanding to treat cancer.

    He shares fascinating studies and theories with listeners, exploring
    How growing a tumor in vitro into a spheroid allows researchers to study it as an organism, How cancer cells transitioning from epithelial to mesenchymal tissue enables mobility, What the "Big Bang" hypothesis means in cancer research, and Why understanding the low cancer rate in whales might help our own treatment. Carlo Maley is an associate professor with the Biodesign Institute in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University and is the director of the Arizona Cancer and Evolution Center.

    He specializes in cancer, evolution, and computational biology. He explains that cancer and evolution intersect on two different levels. First, within our bodies, cells are evolving and competing, mutating and surviving or failing. These processes can lead to the beginnings of cancer. Second, when doctors treat cancer with methods like chemotherapy, selective pressures again determine evolutionary forces, leading to resistance.
    Professor Maley explores both of these levels in imaginative detail, explaining for example how bone marrow cancer growth and lung cancer may have different pressures and mechanism to progress through natural selection and competition. It's this competition of cells that creates phenomena such as removing a tumor leading to increased metastases. He explains that, in "many of these mutations. . .  that affect the biology of a cell, actually, are going to be advantageous for the cell, but ultimately bad for the body." Yet, cancer cells are able to coopt cellular machinery that leads to cooperation. He touches on numerous puzzles, including the role of bacteria and microbiomes in some cancers, and shares some exciting research into adaptive therapies.

    Listen in for an enlightening and hopeful view into cutting-edge cancer research.

    Episode also available on Apple Podcasts: apple.co/30PvU9C

    • 47 min

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
379 Ratings

379 Ratings

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The podcast ever

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Awesome!

Great podcast. Please keep it going. The content is so useful! Love listening!

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Life saving!

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