14 episodes

In this series, Atlantic staff writer Olga Khazan analyzes what it takes to change our relationships, our work, and our perspective—with a practical approach to one of life’s greatest mysteries: how to start over. Change can be really hard. Inertia is powerful, mortgages and marriages are long-term, and personality traits can feel pretty hardwired. But we’re in an era characterized by change. This series is your guide to starting over in the ways you’ve always wanted, why change is so hard, and whether it is, sometimes, overrated.
This series was produced by Rebecca Rashid and hosted by Olga Khazan. Editing by A.C. Valdez and Claudine Ebeid. Fact-check by Ena Alvarado. Sound design by Matthew Simonson. If you have any questions, stories, or feedback, please email us at howtopodcast@theatlantic.com or leave us a voicemail at 925-967-2091.

How to Start Over The Atlantic

    • Education
    • 4.5 • 545 Ratings

In this series, Atlantic staff writer Olga Khazan analyzes what it takes to change our relationships, our work, and our perspective—with a practical approach to one of life’s greatest mysteries: how to start over. Change can be really hard. Inertia is powerful, mortgages and marriages are long-term, and personality traits can feel pretty hardwired. But we’re in an era characterized by change. This series is your guide to starting over in the ways you’ve always wanted, why change is so hard, and whether it is, sometimes, overrated.
This series was produced by Rebecca Rashid and hosted by Olga Khazan. Editing by A.C. Valdez and Claudine Ebeid. Fact-check by Ena Alvarado. Sound design by Matthew Simonson. If you have any questions, stories, or feedback, please email us at howtopodcast@theatlantic.com or leave us a voicemail at 925-967-2091.

    The Misgivings of Friend-Making

    The Misgivings of Friend-Making

    In the post-social-distancing era, some of us can’t remember how to make a new friend. But for many, making friends has always been a challenge—left as an unfulfilled desire without any clear course of action. 
    In this episode of How to Start Over, we explore the barriers to friendship formation in adulthood, how to navigate conflict, and why starting over as a better friend begins with getting out of our own heads. 
    This episode was produced by Rebecca Rashid and is hosted by Olga Khazan. Editing by A.C. Valdez and Claudine Ebeid. Fact-check by Ena Alvarado. Engineering by Matthew Simonson. Special thanks to Adrienne LaFrance, executive editor of The Atlantic. 
    Be part of How to Start Over. Write to us at howtopodcast@theatlantic.com. To support this podcast, and get unlimited access to all of The Atlantic’s journalism, become a subscriber.
    Music by FLYIN (“Being Nostalgic”), Monte Carlo (“Ballpoint”), Mindme (“Anxiety [Instrumental Version]”), Timothy Infinite (“Rapid Years”), and Sarah, the Illstrumentalist (“Building Character”).
    Click here to listen to more full-length episodes in The Atlantic’s How To series.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 38 min
    When Can a Marriage Be Saved?

    When Can a Marriage Be Saved?

    Romantic relationships often show us the deep divide between expectations and reality. For any relationship struggling to overcome conflict, the first step to starting over may be identifying how your vision of marriage is out of step with your partner’s. 
    In this episode of How to Start Over, we explore why some marriages can withstand conflict, why most couples struggle to validate their partner’s needs, and how to think about when a breakup is in order—by better understanding why the relationship is struggling. 
    This episode was produced by Rebecca Rashid and is hosted by Olga Khazan. Editing by A.C. Valdez and Claudine Ebeid. Fact-check by Ena Alvarado. Engineering by Matthew Simonson. Special thanks to Adrienne LaFrance, executive editor of The Atlantic. 
    Be part of How to Start Over. Write to us at howtopodcast@theatlantic.com. To support this podcast, and get unlimited access to all of The Atlantic’s journalism, become a subscriber.
    Music by FLYIN (“Being Nostalgic”), Monte Carlo (“Ballpoint”), Mindme (“Anxiety [Instrumental Version]”), Timothy Infinite (“Rapid Years”), Sarah, the Illstrumentalist (“Building Character”), and Gregory David (“Twist One”).
    Click here to listen to more full-length episodes in The Atlantic’s How To series.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 40 min
    When Partnership Is Not the Destination

    When Partnership Is Not the Destination

    In a society dominated by romantic couples, it can be hard to accept your unpartnered state for what it is. But for the “single at heart,” the desire for partnership is nonexistent—replaced with a sense of self-sufficiency, satisfaction, and robust friendships. 
    In this episode of How to Start Over, we explore misconceptions about singlehood and what explains a broad perception of it as an unwelcome fate. We also talk about how social and economic structures orient themselves around couples, and discuss arguments for why stigmas against solo living and single life are long overdue for a change. 
    This episode was produced by Rebecca Rashid and is hosted by Olga Khazan. Editing by A.C. Valdez and Claudine Ebeid. Fact-check by Ena Alvarado. Engineering by Matthew Simonson. Special thanks to managing editor Andrea Valdez and Adrienne LaFrance, executive editor of The Atlantic. 
    Be part of How to Start Over. Write to us at howtopodcast@theatlantic.com. To support this podcast, and get unlimited access to all of The Atlantic’s journalism, become a subscriber.
    Music by FLYIN (“Being Nostalgic”), Timothy Infinite (“Rapid Years”), and Matt Large ("Value Every Moment" “The Marathon Will Continue [For Nipsey]”).
    Click here to listen to more full-length episodes in The Atlantic’s How To series.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 31 min
    'Parents Are Not All Good and All Bad'

    'Parents Are Not All Good and All Bad'

    Some families have the frictionless ease of unconditional love and understanding, but for many the stalemate of family tensions can be insurmountable.
    In this episode of How to Start Over, we explore what can be done to evaluate the dynamics in lifelong family relationships, find ways to manage our emotional response when tensions boil over, and analyze what it means to change a parent-child relationship as an adult. 
    This episode was produced by Rebecca Rashid and is hosted by Olga Khazan. Editing by A.C. Valdez and Claudine Ebeid. Fact-check by Ena Alvarado. Engineering by Matthew Simonson. Special thanks to Adrienne LaFrance, executive editor of The Atlantic. 
    Be part of How to Start Over. Write to us at howtopodcast@theatlantic.com. To support this podcast, and get unlimited access to all of The Atlantic’s journalism, become a subscriber.
    Music by FLYIN (“Being Nostalgic”), Mindme (“Anxiety [Instrumental Version]”), Sarah, the Illstrumentalist (“Building Character”), and Timothy Infinite (“Rapid Years”). 
    Click here to listen to more full-length episodes in The Atlantic’s How To series.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 28 min
    Starting Over When You Think It's Too Late

    Starting Over When You Think It's Too Late

    A professional change in midlife can provide a much-needed reset—at least when you’re looking for a career that more closely aligns with your passion. But finding what you love, especially once you’ve gone down an entirely different path, can feel impossible. How do we redirect our efforts away from what we’re used to and toward what we want to do?  
    In this episode of How to Start Over, we explore what impacts our decision making in midlife, whether midlife malaise explains our need for change, and how to know if a professional change is worth it. Conversations with novelist Angie Kim and professor of human development and social policy Hannes Schwandt help us think through whether it’s ever too late to do what you really love. 
    This episode was produced by Rebecca Rashid and is hosted by Olga Khazan. Editing by A.C. Valdez and Claudine Ebeid. Fact-check by Ena Alvarado. Engineering by Matthew Simonson. Special thanks to Adrienne LaFrance, executive editor of The Atlantic. 
    Be part of How to Start Over. Write to us at howtopodcast@theatlantic.com. To support this podcast, and get unlimited access to all of The Atlantic’s journalism, become a subscriber.
    Music by Matt Large (“Value Every Moment,” “The Marathon Will Continue [For Nipsey]”), FLYIN (“Being Nostalgic”), and Blue Steel (“Jaded”).
    Click here to listen to more full-length episodes in The Atlantic’s How To series.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 32 min
    Introducing: How To Start Over

    Introducing: How To Start Over

    In this series, Atlantic staff writer Olga Khazan analyzes what it takes to change our relationships, our work, and our perspective—with a practical approach to one of life’s greatest mysteries: how to start over. 
    Change can be really hard. Inertia is powerful, mortgages and marriages are long-term, and personality traits can feel pretty hardwired. But we’re in an era characterized by change. This series is your guide to starting over in the ways you’ve always wanted, why change is so hard, and whether it is, sometimes, overrated.
    This series was produced by Rebecca Rashid and hosted by Olga Khazan. Editing by A.C. Valdez and Claudine Ebeid. Fact-check by Ena Alvarado. Sound design by Matthew Simonson.
    If you have any questions, stories, or feedback, please email us at howtopodcast@theatlantic.com or leave us a voicemail at 925-967-2091.
    Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

    • 2 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
545 Ratings

545 Ratings

PodcastGoose ,

Really Enjoying Olga and HTSO

I LOVE How To Start Over. I find myself looking forward to each episode and I keep sharing them with my friends. I really like Olga as the host. She’s so authentic which makes her vulnerable and real in a way that you don’t often see in podcast hosts. I love the classic soft spoken podcast host too but it gets a bit repetitive and you rarely hear them challenge their guests in an insightful way. The length of the podcast is perfect and overall the production of the podcast is high quality. Can’t wait to hear more!

nemprohominesnes ,

Hollow vanity project for a CV

Disappointed that this podcast is self-consciously attempting to be esoteric and erudite but is an Atlantic vanity project that, despite tossing out references to scholars & scholarship and employing the language of academia, is shallow. A discussion about the dichotomy of pain to define happiness is something a priest at my elementary school would have counseled. I would have expected much greater depth here. Yet that discussion, for example, ignores that people suffering real, chronic, debilitating, physical pain that does not kill them directly and never ceases. Further, rather than inclusion the podcast intentionally or not excludes the lives, experiences, and realities of the vast majority of the world. A podcast about the issues of heteronormative, economically stable, professionally successful white people on a quest to be 10% happier adds little or nothing.

Mig1031 ,

Bring Arthur Brooks back

Something about Olga that feels too whiny and all about her and her relationship. I want good convos with good questions. I came across this podcast because I was looking for something positive, enlightening, educational. The first episodes were with Arthur Brooks and he sucked me in. From his voice, to advice, questions and he’s just a great listener. I’m not so sure if I’ll continue to listen. I’m sorry.

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