150 episodes

David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the magazine’s legendary Shouts and Murmurs page. The New Yorker has set a standard in journalism for generations and The New Yorker Radio Hour gives it a voice on public radio for the first time. Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many more.
© WNYC Studios

The New Yorker Radio Hour WNYC

    • News
    • 4.3 • 3.8K Ratings

David Remnick is joined by The New Yorker’s award-winning writers, editors and artists to present a weekly mix of profiles, storytelling, and insightful conversations about the issues that matter — plus an occasional blast of comic genius from the magazine’s legendary Shouts and Murmurs page. The New Yorker has set a standard in journalism for generations and The New Yorker Radio Hour gives it a voice on public radio for the first time. Produced by The New Yorker and WNYC Studios.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including Radiolab, On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin, Nancy and many more.
© WNYC Studios

    Should the Climate Movement Embrace Sabotage?

    Should the Climate Movement Embrace Sabotage?

    Andreas Malm, a climate activist and senior lecturer at Lund University, in Sweden, studies the relationship between climate change and capitalism. With the United Nations climate meeting in Glasgow rapidly approaching—it begins on October 31st—Malm tells David Remnick that he believes environmentalists should not place too much faith in talks or treaties of this kind. Instead, he insists that the climate movement rethinks its roots in nonviolence. His book is provocatively titled “How to Blow Up a Pipeline,” though it is not exactly an instruction manual. Malm advocates for “intelligent sabotage” of fossil-fuel infrastructure to prevent more carbon from being emitted in the atmosphere. “I am in favor of destroying machines, property—not harming people. That’s a very important distinction,” he tells Remnick. Plus: Parul Sehgal, The New Yorker’s newest staff writer, introduces David Remnick to some notable works off the syllabus of a class she is teaching. It’s called “Writing the Unspeakable,” about the literature of trauma and atrocity.

    • 35 min
    Jelani Cobb on the Kerner Report, an Unheeded Warning about the Consequences of Racism

    Jelani Cobb on the Kerner Report, an Unheeded Warning about the Consequences of Racism

    In 1967, in the wake of a violent uprising in Detroit, President Lyndon B. Johnson assembled the National Advisory Commission on Civil Disorders to investigate what had happened. This seemed futile: another panel to investigate yet another uprising. “A lot of people felt that way—‘We don’t need more studies, nothing’s going to come out of that commission,’ ” Fred Harris, a former senator from Oklahoma and the commission’s last surviving member, tells Jelani Cobb. But the conclusions were not typical at all. In the final analysis, known as the Kerner Report, the commission named white racism—no euphemisms—as the root cause of unrest in the United States, and said that the country was “moving toward two societies, one Black, one White—separate and unequal.” The report called for sweeping changes and investments in jobs, housing, policing, and more; the recommendations went so far beyond Johnson’s anti-poverty programs of the nineteen-sixties that the President shelved the report and refused to meet with his own commission. The Kerner Report, Cobb says, was “an unheeded warning,” as America still struggles today to acknowledge the reality of systemic racism. 

    Jelani Cobb co-edited and wrote the introduction to “The Essential Kerner Commission Report,” which was published this year.

    • 19 min
    Joaquin Castro: “Americans Don’t Know Who Latinos Are”

    Joaquin Castro: “Americans Don’t Know Who Latinos Are”

    On Tuesday, the U.S. Government Accountability Office issued a preliminary report on the long-standing underrepresentation of Latinos in the media. While most people consider Hollywood a relatively liberal industry, “the system as a whole is actually quite regressive and . . . exclusionary,” Joaquin Castro, the representative of a Texas district that includes much of San Antonio, says. “I’m convinced that Americans don’t know who Latinos are,” Castro tells Stephania Taladrid. Unlike Black Americans, who are linked in the white imagination to the civil-rights era and other historical turning points, Castro says, non-Latinos “don’t associate us with any particular time period in American history. They don’t know who among us has contributed to the nation’s prosperity or success. And they have no sense where to place us within American society.” What Castro calls a “void” in America’s narrative gets filled by pernicious stereotypes of Latinos as criminals and “illegals.” “There has been now, for several years at least, this dangerous nexus between representation, portrayal, and the abuse of Latino stereotypes . . . by politicians who abuse them for their own political gain. And, in that dangerous mix, in its worst form, you get what happened in El Paso in August of 2019, where a madman drove ten hours and killed twenty-three people because he considered them Hispanic invaders.” Castro suggests that states and local governments should do more to hold the media accountable, for example, by tying tax breaks for entertainment production to improvements on diversity.

    • 22 min
    Wes Anderson and Jeffrey Wright on “The French Dispatch”

    Wes Anderson and Jeffrey Wright on “The French Dispatch”

    “I wanted to do a French movie, and I had this idea of wanting to do a New Yorker movie,” Wes Anderson explains. “Somehow, I also wanted to do one of those omnibus-type things where it was a collection of short stories.” The result is the new film “The French Dispatch.” Anderson describes his interest in The New Yorker as “almost fetishistic.” Each of the movie’s four story lines was inspired by a work from the magazine or by one of its writers, though Anderson has played freely with biography. Jeffrey Wright, for example, plays Roebuck Wright, an amalgam of James Baldwin, a Black American expatriate in provincial France, and A. J. Liebling, a beloved writer on food and much else from The New Yorker’s early years. “Even in exile,” the actor says, his character “realizes that he’s only at home within himself, that there is no home for him. And maybe there is no home for anyone, really, other than within one’s own body and one’s own soul.” Anderson and Wright join David Remnick to discuss “The French Dispatch” and the classic New Yorker essays that inspired it.

    • 29 min
    Bonus: “The French Dispatch” Reads The New Yorker

    Bonus: “The French Dispatch” Reads The New Yorker

    Wes Anderson’s new film, “The French Dispatch,” is about a magazine, and it was inspired by Anderson’s long-standing love of The New Yorker. In this special episode, introduced by the articles editor Susan Morrison, cast members read excerpts from classic works associated with the magazine. Bill Murray reads a letter from the editor Harold Ross to an angry writer, Steve Park reads James Thurber, and Elisabeth Moss reads E. B. White. Owen Wilson reads Joseph Mitchell’s piece on rats; Frances McDormand reads Mavis Gallant’s record of the 1968 student uprising in Paris; Tilda Swinton reads a Calvin Tomkins art-world profile; and Jeffrey Wright reads James Baldwin’s “Equal in Paris,” a remarkable indictment of French institutions.

    • 28 min
    The Insidious Procedural Traps of the Texas Abortion Law

    The Insidious Procedural Traps of the Texas Abortion Law

    The new Texas law Senate Bill 8 effectively outlaws abortion in Texas, violating constitutional protections on reproductive rights. Yet the Supreme Court is in no rush to review it. The law professor and staff writer Jeannie Suk Gersen speaks with Leah Litman, a law professor at the University of Michigan. They examine the novel ways in which the law insulates itself from judicial review. “It seems like the Texas law is an onion, with layers upon layers of unconstitutionality,” Suk Gersen notes. “It’s basically saying to the courts, ‘We’ll do your job for you. You are cut out of this.’ ” 

     

    Plus, Jia Tolentino talks with the pop musician Caroline Polachek, as the singer-songwriter gets ready to play her first live concert since March of 2020, for the biggest crowd of her career.

    • 29 min

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5
3.8K Ratings

3.8K Ratings

Marcellito ,

Just Great

David Remnick has the voice of reason, humor and he knows how to cross examine a jerk (see, e.g., his interview of Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot from about a year ago). The topics are diverse and I’m listening now to the interview of Rez Ahmed, a genius I knew first as an actor in The Night Of.

treefort101 ,

Precession melts icecaps

The earths natural spin or rotation in the solar system and its electromagnetic attachment to everything in the universe changes as its natural precession takes place. Since 1850s the North Pole (creates the icecaps) has moved 1000s of miles from Greenland to over Siberia. The electromagnetic field lines create the icecaps and when they move so do the icecaps. Global warming is cyclical and can’t be stopped. It is a blessing in disguise as we shift mankind’s use of petroleum coal and nuclear to organic energetics. 3500 years ago the Santorini volcano erupted sending a tsunami down the Nile river shifting the river away from the Giza pyramid complex rendering the pyramids useless… almost. They still trap electromagnetic radiation from the magnetic field lines. Prior to the tsunami the aquifer systems under the pyramids created massive amounts of energy including the double ringed disc or what was misnamed solar disc. The double ringed disc is Antihydrogen fusion converting anti helium to light or aether or dark energy or spacetime in the configuration of the fusion or Fibonacci Spiral… the spin for everything in the universe from DNA to galaxies 🌀. It’s reproducible! Nikola Tesla gave us free energy and antigravity in 1906, it was hidden away from society while it’s technologies were quietly reproduced. Einstein was a shill misguiding scientists globally with a masterpiece of garbled theory Nikola Tesla called “ Einstein's relativity work is a magnificent mathematical garb which fascinates, dazzles and makes people blind to the underlying errors.” ______ E=MC2 is only the measurement for the amount of aether a particle density controls.

Tintin Malfoy ,

Great podcast, except…

I really enjoy this podcast. Unfortunately some of the writers’ vocal fry is so grating I skip over those pieces ☹️

Top Podcasts In News

You Might Also Like

More by WNYC