88 episodes

Dave Chang has a few questions. Besides being the chef of the Momofuku restaurants and the creator and host of Netflix’s 'Ugly Delicious,' Dave is an avid student and fan of sports, music, art, film, and, of course, food. In ranging conversations that cover everything from the creative process to his guest’s guiltiest pleasures, Dave and a rotating cast of smart, thought-provoking guests talk about their inspirations, failures, successes, fame, and identities.

The Dave Chang Show The Ringer

    • Society & Culture
    • 4.9, 3.7K Ratings

Dave Chang has a few questions. Besides being the chef of the Momofuku restaurants and the creator and host of Netflix’s 'Ugly Delicious,' Dave is an avid student and fan of sports, music, art, film, and, of course, food. In ranging conversations that cover everything from the creative process to his guest’s guiltiest pleasures, Dave and a rotating cast of smart, thought-provoking guests talk about their inspirations, failures, successes, fame, and identities.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5
3.7K Ratings

3.7K Ratings

Cple85 ,

Unexpected pleasure

Dave has become one of the best podcaster in the game. Knowledgable, honest, and open to other ideas. It’s been a pleasure.

We’re all out of that ,

food for thought

Spent 20 years in the business and wish that this pod cast existed when I was starting my career. So much great information and conversation. I have learned a lot from all the guests, which then leads to reading and on it goes.

Ali from Austin ,

Ask Dave—Angela Duckworth

This one feels a little strange to put out there, but here we go. I love the show. As an Executive Director of an arts nonprofit and relatively new leader, I find so many of the discussions on this show so helpful. I was especially interested in the conversation with Angela Duckworth about grit, resolve, and increasing your suffering. I perked up during the conversation about parenting because my wife and I are beginning to have conversations about becoming parents and how we would parent our child. And philosophically, we both agree with the approach that you take with Hugo and being present with the baby monitors but not rushing in to pick him up when crying. He eventually comforted himself and went back to bed. As an adolescent I was failing in school, and my parents tried everything—private schools, tutors, etc—but nothing worked. One summer we visited Pakistan where I was born and my father is from. When the summer was over, my parents told me that I wasn’t coming home. I stayed with my aunt and uncle and attended school in Pakistan where I would get more attention and a better schooling in their mind. This was their last attempt at fixing things. And it actually worked. I hated it at the time but I really discovered a lot of resolve and strength through that experience. It was only years and years later in therapy however that I began to unpack the effect that it had on me. Although I didn’t see it this way at the time, and I understand my parent’s motivation, it felt like being abandoned and left in a country I didn’t know or understand. How do you approach parenting and managing/leading and increasing suffering while also protecting from long-terms not immediately apparent trauma or damage? I hope that makes sense! Love the show and can’t wait to listen to more.

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