149 episodes

A two-time Peabody Award-winner, Radiolab is an investigation told through sounds and stories, and centered around one big idea. In the Radiolab world, information sounds like music and science and culture collide. Hosted by Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich, the show is designed for listeners who demand skepticism, but appreciate wonder.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin.
© WNYC Studios

Radiolab WNYC

    • Natural Sciences
    • 4.8, 24.6K Ratings

A two-time Peabody Award-winner, Radiolab is an investigation told through sounds and stories, and centered around one big idea. In the Radiolab world, information sounds like music and science and culture collide. Hosted by Jad Abumrad and Robert Krulwich, the show is designed for listeners who demand skepticism, but appreciate wonder.
WNYC Studios is a listener-supported producer of other leading podcasts including On the Media, Snap Judgment, Death, Sex & Money, Nancy and Here’s the Thing with Alec Baldwin.
© WNYC Studios

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5
24.6K Ratings
24.6K Ratings
ADDaD ,

It's hard to estimate the value of this podcast

This podcast stands out as pretty much constantly astounding. As someone who writes about science for a living, the 'scientific' concepts here are rendered in an enviably fascinating and pretty much idiot-proof way. It's a testament to the skills of the hosts in their use of the audio format that they can cruise through really complex stuff and give the ordinary listener entertainment and learning in a single scoop. This is the best. Now if they would only get season one on itunes....

MeFiFum ,

Samoa Episode made me cringe

It was repulsive to listen to two clueless white Americans talk about this complex case of birthright citizenship and present Samoans as irrational for not agreeing with their privilege-laden ignorance. You were so incredulous and even laughed at the Samoans’ stance, but their reservations were perfectly understandable. The US has a long and ongoing tradition of obliterating cultures they consider to be inferior. Allowing anyone born in Samoa to become citizens would, according to the entirety of American history, result in Samoa being a carbon copy of the rest of the American empire. That means the white and well-to-Do would eventually seize power and all of the most desirable parts of land. People of color would be forced out by racism and gentrification and systemically oppressed JUST LIKE IN THE UNITED STATES. To hear the lawyer talk about trusting the US government is absolutely insane. This is a country where the oppressed have to fight for decades, centuries in some cases, for rights and protections freely given to wealthy white people. I think the Samoans would be better off fighting for gender and lgbt equality in their own country instead of fighting for something like birthright citizenship, which would eventually screw them in the end. 45 is a perfect reminder that we still have a LONG way to go in the US when it comes to treating people of color with dignity and respect. And Hawaii was and is a cautionary tale, just like Palestine is. When you allow non-natives to buy land, you open the door to people who will eventually take over your home, destroy your culture, and profit from your oppression.

motorrad245 ,

It used to be good.

Not anymore. Stopped listening

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