300 episodes

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

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    • Business
    • 4.4 • 420 Ratings

The daily drama of money and work from the BBC.

    What it takes to vaccinate the world

    What it takes to vaccinate the world

    With Covid-19 vaccinations preparing to roll out, how do we make sure everyone gets it? John Johnson, a vaccine programme co-ordinator for Doctors without Borders, outlines just how much is involved in getting vaccines, by truck, motorbike and even foot, to every town and village in the developing world. The Covid-19 vaccine, like others, needs to be transported below a certain temperature, adding an extra layer of complexity, as Toby Peters from the University of Birmingham explains. But David Elliot, of Dulas Solar, says technology like their solar-powered refrigerators can help solve the problem in sub-Saharan Africa. Rebecca Weintraub, Faculty Director of the Global Health Delivery Project at Harvard University, is enthusiastic that the world’s institutions can come together to co-ordinate the task.

    Producers: Frey Lindsay and Joshua Thorpe.

    (Picture: A Malaria vaccine implementation pilot programme in Malawi, April 2019. Image credit: AFP via Getty Images)

    • 18 min
    Rich countries line up for Covid-19 vaccine

    Rich countries line up for Covid-19 vaccine

    After Pfizer and Moderna vaccines earlier in the month, a third arrives from the University of Oxford. The question now becomes when the vaccines will be distributed and to whom. We’ll hear from Bruce Y Lee, professor at CUNY Graduate School of Public Health, about just how daunting a task a global inoculation programme will be. Meanwhile, Alex de Jonquieres, the head of the Vaccine Alliance Gavi, explains how they’re trying to make sure every country can afford enough of the vaccine to protect their country. But Kate Elder, senior vaccine policy advisor at Doctors without Borders, says there’s nothing to stop richer countries jumping to the front of the queue.

    Producer: Frey Lindsay.

    (Image credit: Getty Creative)

    • 18 min
    What children owe their parents

    What children owe their parents

    Is it up to children to support their parents financially? Manuela Saragosa hears from Lamees Wajahat in Canada, who has been supporting her parents to pay the bills since she had her first part-time job. But is it the duty of the family, or the state to provide? Manuela speaks to Professor Sarah Harper of Oxford University, who argues that opportunities for younger generations are better than ever before, and that family obligations have always been a part of life. (Pic of piggy bank via Getty Images).

    • 17 min
    Business Weekly

    Business Weekly

    In this edition of Business Weekly, we look at Britain’s drive to go green, and how effective the proposed ban on sales of new petrol and diesel cars might be. The Chief Operating Officer of the electric vehicle maker Polestar tells us what help the automotive industry needs from the government to persuade people to buy electric. Plus, we meet the first British Royal Air Force officer to openly transition from male to female and chat to her about transgender rights in the workplace. We also look at the digital afterlife and hear from some of the companies promising to manage our online affairs once we’ve passed away. And we discuss why the British Royal Family are still seen as fashion icons. Business Weekly is presented by Lucy Burton and produced by Matthew Davies.

    • 49 min
    How Africa's economies are withstanding Coronavirus

    How Africa's economies are withstanding Coronavirus

    Many African countries have been praised for waging effective campaigns against coronavirus, and the region has a relatively low case count compared to Europe and the US. African economies have likewise been hit less hard, and Amandla Ooko-Ombaka of McKinsey and Company explains how a mix of a youthful population, hot climate and swift government response helped many of these economies stay resilient. But Lisa Owino, of the Kenyan human rights organisation KELIN, says in some cases government intervention over-stepped and was overly punitive to ordinary people. And Tosin Eniolorunda, founder & Chief Executive of Nigerian financial services company TeamApt says digital finance tools helped people maintain social distancing while conducting business.

    (Picture: Kenyans walk past a mural about the Coronavirus in Nairobi. Picture credit: Getty Images)

    • 18 min
    Can Fintech fuel Africa’s Covid recovery?

    Can Fintech fuel Africa’s Covid recovery?

    2019 was a landmark year for investment into digital financial services, or Fintech, across Africa. Despite the pandemic, the Fintech scene is not only still thriving; it’s poised to play a key role in Africa’s economic recovery. Uzoma Dozie, the head of Nigerian startup Sparkle, says with Covid limiting our ability to handle cash, the cashless revolution in Africa is moving along rapidly. But Viola Llewellyn, president of Ovamba Solutions, which helps finance small businesses across Africa, says some sectors of African banking still lagged behind in digital services provision. Barbara Iyayi of Unicorn Growth Capital says Africa has a “perfect storm” of a young population, prevalent mobile services and a low rate of bank account holding, means Fintech will thrive across African economies but the infrastructure needs to be built up more.

    (Image credit: Getty Creative)

    • 18 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
420 Ratings

420 Ratings

SAARKÉSH ,

Rethinking the Future, PARTIALLY

As a futurist & technologist, I found this episode to offer a half-baked vision of what could be a possible path for humanity without any consideration to the required economical model.
Thank you for your engaging podcast.

CogetteUS ,

Wondering what?

“Cruise ships navigating the narrow canals and waterways” -of Venice? What?

Peterson3018 ,

Good Podcast

I often listen to this podcast and hope they continue to report solid news from a honest and fair perspective. It was refreshing to see a headline about something other than blaming Orange Man. I voted for Obama and the healthcare system he tried to put together still almost bankrupt me when I needed help, being self employed. Healthcare issues and affordability has never, EVER been easy for self employed, working 7 days a week. It drains anything we try to save for retirement. Americans just don’t save $ very well and that’s another issue why people rely on outside help for healthcare. Illegals get more free help and support than I’ve ever got working hard paying taxes for the last 38 years. It’s an on-going issue, almost impossible to solve unless we control and manage our laws for the ones that actually work hard and pay into the system. The Amish have a very interesting model of healthcare they manage on their own, and it works! but people keep getting free $ to not work here, that just can’t fix anything if it’s only one side pulling the weight.

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