563 episodes

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.


For complete access to the original papers featured in the Nature Podcast, subscribe to Nature.

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    • Science
    • 4.5 • 598 Ratings

The Nature Podcast brings you the best stories from the world of science each week. We cover everything from astronomy to zoology, highlighting the most exciting research from each issue of Nature journal. We meet the scientists behind the results and provide in-depth analysis from Nature's journalists and editors.


For complete access to the original papers featured in the Nature Podcast, subscribe to Nature.

    Has the world’s oldest known animal been discovered?

    Has the world’s oldest known animal been discovered?

    Researchers debate whether an ancient fossil is the oldest animal yet discovered, and a new way to eavesdrop on glaciers.
     
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    • 23 min
    Audio long-read: How ancient people fell in love with bread, beer and other carbs

    Audio long-read: How ancient people fell in love with bread, beer and other carbs

    Archaeological evidence shows that ancient people ate bread, beer and other carbs, long before domesticated crops.
     
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    • 23 min
    Coronapod: the latest on COVID and sporting events

    Coronapod: the latest on COVID and sporting events

    Early in 2021 the United Kingdom, along with several other countries, allowed mass gatherings as part of a series of controlled studies aimed at better understanding the role events could play in the pandemic. The goal was to inform policy - however early results have provided limited data on viral transmission. 


    As the Olympic games kick off in Tokyo, we delve into the research, asking what the limitations have been, if more data will become available and whether policy makers are likely to take the findings into account in the future.


    News: COVID and mass sport events: early studies yield limited insights
    News: Why England’s COVID ‘freedom day’ alarms researchers
    Podcast: Coronapod: does England's COVID strategy risk breeding deadly variants?


    Subscribe to Nature Briefing, an unmissable daily round-up of science news, opinion and analysis free in your inbox every weekday.
     
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    • 15 min
    How the US is rebooting gun violence research

    How the US is rebooting gun violence research

    Funding for gun violence research in the US returns after a 20-year federal hiatus, and the glass sponges that can manipulate ocean currents.
     
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    • 26 min
    Coronapod: Does England's COVID strategy risk breeding deadly variants?

    Coronapod: Does England's COVID strategy risk breeding deadly variants?

    The UK government has announced that virtually all COVID restrictions will be removed in England on Monday 18th July. This will do away with social distancing requirements, allow businesses to re-open to full capacity and remove legal mask mandates. This decision comes, however, amidst soaring infections rates in the country, driven by the delta variant.


    Now scientists are questioning the wisdom of this policy and asking whether the combination of high transmission and a partially vaccinated population could provide the perfect breeding ground for vaccine-resistant variants - a possibility which could have devastating global consequences.


    News: Why England’s COVID ‘freedom day’ alarms researchers
     
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    • 20 min
    How deadly heat waves expose historic racism

    How deadly heat waves expose historic racism

    Heat waves have disproportionate impacts on minorities in US cities, and after critiquing his own papers a researcher extols the value of self-criticism.
     
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    • 36 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
598 Ratings

598 Ratings

GrantGiesbrecht ,

Best Science Podcast

They do a great job presenting cutting edge research in a fascinating and precise, yet easy to understand way. I’d definitely suggest giving Nature a try

ccshatz ,

Evolving

Heidi clear new voice in addition to stalwarts. Good editing.

Ain Stolkiner ,

not as good as it used to be

The reporters give biased personal opinions on science that make it hard to tell fact from opinion

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