186 episodes

Strongly-held opinions. Open-minded debates. A weekly ideas show, hosted by Jane Coaston.

The Argument The New York Times

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    • 4.1 • 5.9K Ratings

Strongly-held opinions. Open-minded debates. A weekly ideas show, hosted by Jane Coaston.

    The Economy Is Weird. Two Experts on Where It Goes From Here.

    The Economy Is Weird. Two Experts on Where It Goes From Here.

    If you’re confused about the current state of the economy and where it’s headed, you’re not alone. The United States is experiencing inflation at the highest rate since the 1980s, and most Americans generally feel as bad about the economy as they did during the Great Recession of 2008. At the same time, unemployment is low and wages are rising.

    On today’s episode of “The Argument,” host Jane Coaston consults two economics reporters to break down these conflicting trends in the economy and to ask the question so many people want answered: Are things going to get worse before they get better?

    Peter Coy is an Opinion writer for The New York Times. Alexandra Scaggs is a senior writer at Barron’s, where she covers bonds markets. Both have different takes on how the Federal Reserve can try to bring inflation down without long-term repercussions, including a recession. “There are people who would say, well, fine, that’s what needs to happen, if that’s what it takes to extinguish this high inflation, so be it,” Coy says. “And I’m just saying, I’m not willing to go that far.”

    • 27 min
    Trump, the Primaries and the ‘Populism of Resentment’ Shaping the G.O.P.

    Trump, the Primaries and the ‘Populism of Resentment’ Shaping the G.O.P.

    May is chock-full of primary elections, and they are starting to provide a picture of how deep the G.O.P. is entrenched in Trumpism. J.D. Vance, the 37-year-old venture capitalist and author of the acclaimed memoir “Hillbilly Elegy,” won the Republican Senate primary in Ohio — with the endorsement of Donald Trump. The rise of Vance paints a telling portrait of how the G.O.P. is evolving in its appeal to its conservative base. Vance eagerly sought Trump’s endorsement and praise. Does it mean that the party is becoming a “populism of tribal loyalty,” as suggested by one of today’s guests?

    Today on “The Argument,” host Jane Coaston wants to know what this month’s Republican primary elections can actually tell us about the future of the G.O.P. and if it signals more Trump in 2024. She is joined two conservative writers, David French and Christopher Caldwell.

    French is a senior editor of “The Dispatch” and a contributing writer at The Atlantic. Caldwell is a contributing writer for New York Times Opinion. “I don’t think anyone disputes that there’s a wide open lane for populist incitement,” French says. “I think the issue with J.D. Vance and the issue with the Republican Party in general is this move that says, we’re going to indulge it. We’re going to stoke it.”

    • 32 min
    ‘You Haven’t Seen Anything Yet’: What’s Next if Roe Goes

    ‘You Haven’t Seen Anything Yet’: What’s Next if Roe Goes

    It was a historic twist in an already historic case: A draft opinion of a Supreme Court decision overturning two landmark rulings — Roe v. Wade and Planned Parenthood v. Casey — leaked to Politico, which published the 98-page document on Monday night. Chief Justice John Roberts said that the draft opinion was authentic but that “it does not represent a decision by the court or the final position of any member on the issues in the case.”

    Even with that caveat, it seems to be a sign of where things are headed — the end of abortion rights as a constitutional right in America.

    On today’s episode of “The Argument,” Jane Coaston is joined by the Times Opinion columnist Michelle Goldberg and editorial board member Jesse Wegman to discuss the implications of the draft opinion and the future of abortion rights in America.

    What is your take on the Roe v. Wade draft leak? We want to hear from you. Share your thoughts on The New York Times website once you’ve listened to the episode.

    • 28 min
    How Did Queer Kids Become the Battlefield For the Right’s Midterm Strategy?

    How Did Queer Kids Become the Battlefield For the Right’s Midterm Strategy?

    Florida’s “Don’t Say Gay” bill, states barring transgender athletes from participating in sports and censoring school curriculums around queer and gender identity — a wave of anti-L.G.B.T.Q. legislation is spreading across the country, sustained in large part by the political right. According to the Human Rights Campaign, this year alone, more than 300 anti-L.G.B.T.Q. bills have been introduced in state legislatures.

    Why has this issue become the focus of the Republican Party? And how is the way society treats individuals who identify as L.G.B.T.Q. changing?

    In today’s episode, Jane Coaston convenes her Times Opinion colleagues, the columnists Ross Douthat and Michelle Goldberg, to debate this issue. Ross brings his conservative lens to the topic of L.G.B.T.Q. issues and Michelle shares a more liberal outlook. In the middle is Jane, who brings a deeply personal perspective to the table: “I think that a lot of these bills seem to spring from what I would say, a willful misunderstanding of how people like me became ourselves,” she says.

    What are your thoughts on the recent anti-L.G.B.T.Q. legislation? We want to hear from you. Share your thoughts in the comments on The New York Times website once you’ve listened to the debate.

    • 38 min
    From Amazon to Starbucks, America Is Unionizing. Will Politics Catch Up?

    From Amazon to Starbucks, America Is Unionizing. Will Politics Catch Up?

    From Amazon and Starbucks to large media companies, unionization has become a siren call for workers — white- and blue-collar — fighting for rights and fair wages. But in 2022, after two years of a pandemic, how have our ideas about unions changed? And are Democrats, the so-called party of the unions, still allies in the fight for workers’ rights?

    On today’s episode of “The Argument,” Jane Coaston asks two leading labor voices in America to debate the current role of unions, how the watershed vote at an Amazon warehouse is changing their work and whether Democrats have failed workers.

    Liz Shuler is the president of the A.F.L.-C.I.O. Jane McAlevey is an organizer and a campaign strategist and the author of the recent book “A Collective Bargain: Unions, Organizing and the Fight for Democracy.”

    “People used to say, ‘It’s the economy, stupid.’ It’s the base, stupid, in my argument,” McAlevey says, emphasizing the need for unions and large organizations like the A.F.L.-C.I.O. to learn from Amazon and focus on bringing more workers into the fold. “If we don’t return to bottom-up organizing, we’re simply not going to have the political muscle to force Democrats and Republicans to do that which they must: to honor the essential workers coming out of this pandemic.”

    What’s your take on unions? How do you think unions should capitalize on this moment? We want to hear from you. Share your thoughts in the comments on The New York Times website once you’ve listened to the debate.

    • 29 min
    The Dangerous Lesson Viktor Orban Taught Republicans

    The Dangerous Lesson Viktor Orban Taught Republicans

    President Biden has described the world as being in a “battle between democracy and autocracy.” And Prime Minister Viktor Orban’s recent victory in Hungary, especially, has marked it as a country in pursuit of what Orban calls an “illiberal democracy.” So what has happened to liberalism, and why is it so deeply challenged today?

    On today’s episode of “The Argument,” Jane Coaston brings the Vox senior correspondent Zack Beauchamp and the Times Opinion columnist Bret Stephens together to debate what’s gone wrong with liberalism. Both take vastly different positions on what the biggest challenge to liberalism is today and how to approach it, but they agree on one thing: Western liberalism is in danger, largely in part from what’s happening abroad.

    “I think liberalism is under profound threat in the United States, even more so in states in Europe, and the person who is effectively the global champion of that illiberal worldview right now strikes me as Vladimir Putin,” Stephens says.

    In January, Beauchamp posted on Twitter: "The biggest challenge for liberalism today is the use of its own key features against it: free speech enabling the spread of authoritarian propaganda, democracy empowering illiberal leaders, markets producing an unresponsive oligarchic class."

    How do you think liberalism is being challenged today? We want to hear from you. Share your thoughts in the comments on The New York Times website once you’ve listened to the debate.

    • 43 min

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5
5.9K Ratings

5.9K Ratings

soulrockerTLee ,

Mandatory vascectomy

How about this: Mandatory paternity tests across the nation. If you have fathered more than 3 children not with the same woman (unless married to each), then you are tracked down through taxes or other means and then get a mandatory Vascectomy or face prison time under felony guidelines.

🦋🦋🦋podblob🦋🦋🦋 ,

Cis opinions on trans issues

It would have been useful if you had included a trans person in your discussion about the bans on trans healthcare for children and proposed bans on trans healthcare for young adults. Not so much “an argument” as it was a group of cis people making assumptions and speculating about what it means to be trans and have your healthcare denied. Unsure how this is functionally any different than the republicans they claim to be making an argument against… ultimately an under-researched, ill-informed, and irresponsible episode to have published.

jackitup ,

Suggest further discussion on Democracy

What definition of democracy are you using when you talk about it?
Are we sure everyone is using the same definition?

Do we actually have governments, local to federal, that derive their just powers from the consent of the governed?

Is it majority rule?
Do we actually have a majority rule when considering all people of voting age, especially those who are denied the right to vote and even those who do not vote?
What percentage of the voting age population voted for our current president?

Many candidates win by 50-60% of those who actually voted, who represents those who did not vote for that candidate
Who do our elected officials actually represent?

What of those who swear that the US is not a democracy, it’s a republic?
These are The same people who don’t want democracy, so what do they want?

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