83 episodes

The other side is dangerously wrong. They think you are too. But for democracy to work, we need to hear each other out. Each week New York Times Opinion columnists Frank Bruni, Ross Douthat and Michelle Goldberg explain the arguments from across the political spectrum. Their candid debates help you form your own opinion of the latest news, and learn how the other half thinks. Find the best ways to persuade in the modern search for common ground.

The Argument The New York Times

    • News
    • 4.4, 3.7K Ratings

The other side is dangerously wrong. They think you are too. But for democracy to work, we need to hear each other out. Each week New York Times Opinion columnists Frank Bruni, Ross Douthat and Michelle Goldberg explain the arguments from across the political spectrum. Their candid debates help you form your own opinion of the latest news, and learn how the other half thinks. Find the best ways to persuade in the modern search for common ground.

    Credibility and Converts: Revisiting Tara Reade and Jane Roe

    Credibility and Converts: Revisiting Tara Reade and Jane Roe

    As reporting on the sexual assault allegation against Joe Biden digs deeper into his accuser’s credibility, where does that leave the Democrats, the press and the #MeToo movement? The columnists debate Tara Reade and the court of public opinion around survivors and the accused. Then, what does Norma McCorvey’s "death bed" confession mean for the pro-choice and pro-life movements? For background reading on this episode, visit nytimes.com/theargument

    • 34 min
    Did de Blasio Bungle the Crisis?

    Did de Blasio Bungle the Crisis?

    When New York’s coronavirus rates began to skyrocket in mid-March, they seemed like a portent for the rest of the country. But at this point, New York City has five times as many Covid-19-related deaths as the entire state of California, with just a quarter of its population. How much blame for New York City’s devastation should go to Mayor Bill de Blasio’s slow response and early downplaying of the danger? Has Gov. Andrew Cuomo earned the praise his briefings have brought him, given his questionable policy choices? debate who deserves blame for New York’s catastrophic mishandling of the crucial first weeks of the coronavirus. What mistakes led to the dispersion of the virus from the Empire State, and what lessons can be learned as other states start to reopen? Then, as the luxury of dining out becomes a distant memory and grocery aisles remain unpredictably stocked, what has quarantine done to the act of enjoying a meal? Plus an ode to humble staples that bring spice to life. For background reading on this episode, visit nytimes.com/theargument

    • 31 min
    Bill Barr’s Junk Justice

    Bill Barr’s Junk Justice

    Is Attorney General Bill Barr’s dropping all charges against Michael Flynn an utter breakdown of justice? Or is it absurd to fixate on Flynn and dredge the Russia investigation up again amid a pandemic? Ross returns to debate Frank and Michelle over just how alarmed Americans should be by recent actions of the Trump Justice Department. Plus, what, exactly, is Obamagate? Then, when it comes to coronavirus, are we too quick to blame the sick? For background reading on this episode, visit nytimes.com/theargument

    • 34 min
    Who’s Afraid of Justin Amash?

    Who’s Afraid of Justin Amash?

    Who would a third party candidate help in the 2020 presidential election? Would adding a Libertarian like Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan to the race hand President Trump his re-election? Or could Amash appeal to would-be Trump voters and goose up the Democrats’ chance at victory come November? With Ross still on parental leave, Frank and Michelle are joined by the Republican strategist Liz Mair to discuss the power third party candidates hold in presidential races. Then, Michelle and Frank hop on a Zoom call to talk about the positives and pitfalls of our new era of video conferencing in both work and play.

    For background reading on this episode, visit nytimes.com/theargument

    • 26 min
    When Science Is Partisan

    When Science Is Partisan

    How can a president who shows disdain for science manage a crisis that requires faith in it? Frank and Michelle debate the federal government's coronavirus response with Yuval Levin, a former policy adviser to President George W. Bush and the founding editor of the conservative journal National Affairs. They talk the fallout of a pandemic hobbled by junk science, understaffed (and under-heeded) federal agencies, and a commander-in-chief lacking management skills. Plus, anti-vaxxers, America's science illiteracy and "President 4chan." For background reading on this episode, visit nytimes.com/theargument

    • 34 min
    Does New York Survive the Coronavirus?

    Does New York Survive the Coronavirus?

    How will the coronavirus change New York City — and what does the city’s response to the pandemic say about the rest of the country? In a special episode, Frank Bruni talks one-on-one with Ginia Bellafante, who writes The Times’s Big City column. For background reading on this episode, visit nytimes.com/theargument

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5
3.7K Ratings

3.7K Ratings

ShellB, CA ,

Thoughtful Civil Debate

Great to hear contrasting views voiced thoughtfully and considerately. Would that we could have political candidates engage in the same kind of substantive discussions about policy that matters.

emma hopewell ,

Great Perspectives

I am so grateful to hear each journalist’s perspective each week. It helps to hear viewpoints that may not resonate with each of us, but will prove important to those around us.

Joey 2050 ,

Always great!

Always a great, compelling discussion!

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