35 episodes

Emerging Form is a podcast about the creative process in which a journalist (Christie Aschwanden) and a poet (Rosemerry Wahtola Trommer) discuss creative conundrums over wine. Each episode concludes with a game of two questions in which a guest joins in to help answer questions about the week's topic. Season one guests include poets, novelists, journalists, a song writer, a circus performer, a sketch artist and a winemaker.

emergingform.substack.com

Emerging Form Christie Aschwanden

    • Books
    • 5.0, 25 Ratings

Emerging Form is a podcast about the creative process in which a journalist (Christie Aschwanden) and a poet (Rosemerry Wahtola Trommer) discuss creative conundrums over wine. Each episode concludes with a game of two questions in which a guest joins in to help answer questions about the week's topic. Season one guests include poets, novelists, journalists, a song writer, a circus performer, a sketch artist and a winemaker.

emergingform.substack.com

    Summer Break

    Summer Break

    Hello dear listeners! We are taking a short summer break. We’ve been putting out new episodes every week, and it feels like time to slow down for a moment and reflect. We’ll be back in August with some brand new regularly scheduled episodes. In the meantime, stay well. Thank you for your support.

    Christie & Rosemerry

    This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at emergingform.substack.com/subscribe

    • 23 sec
    Episode 23: Sara Abou Rashed on art as a courageous act

    Episode 23: Sara Abou Rashed on art as a courageous act

    Putting your values into your art can be a courageous act, and in this episode we speak with poet and storyteller Sara Abou Rashed about the vulnerability and rewards that come from revealing our identity in our work. Rashed comes from Palestine but was born and raised in Syria before moving to Ohio in 2013. She is a senior at Denison University of Ohio and has performed her one-woman show, A Map of Myself, all over the country. Her show explores issues of identity, culture, immigration, belonging and finding home. She’s also given a TEDx talk and been nominated for a Pushcart Prize. We talk about distinguishing between the self who creates the material and the self that presents it and also how audiences respond. Sara also gives us two “assignments” for how we, too, might find ourselves as we move forward in this time of uncertainty and unrest. We ask her these questions, and invite you to answer them as well on our substack page or our Facebook page:

    How do you align your art with your values? 

    What role does art have in creating “the new normal?”

    Sara Abou Rashed’s website

    Sara’s show, Map of Myself

    Trailer for Map of Myself

    Hidden Treasures of a Refugee’s Journey TEDxColumbus

    image of Sara via Instagram

    This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at emergingform.substack.com/subscribe

    • 28 min
    Episode 22: Aaron Abeyta on small town life during the pandemic

    Episode 22: Aaron Abeyta on small town life during the pandemic

    Could a book really save a life? Poet Aaron Abeyta is living proof. In this episode of Emerging Form, part of our miniseries about creativity and COVID-19, we talk with him about how Truman Capote helped transform him from trying to get kicked out of school to being the MFA Poetry Director at Western Colorado University. We also talk about his work as mayor in Antonito, Colorado, and how the pandemic is affecting the small town. We talk about his goal to give voice to others who don’t have one, how Pablo Neruda inspired him to be both poetic and political, and how a story from the Bible has helped guide him in the most difficult times. 

    Show notes:  

    Aaron Abeyta

    In Cold Blood by Truman Capote

    Pablo Neruda

    Antonito, Colorado

    untitled or breathing in a time of covid

    --aaron a. abeyta

    dust veils the valley like dust in spring

    every day wind

    every day this place a personification

    of ache aching that is a falling

    from this horizon into another

    poverty does not create character

    this   the myth of some false

    lying book whose mirrors do not

    shine back at us nor for us

    in a denver hospital Robert Limon cleaves

    at life this breath then another

    breath     his lonely isolation

    the machine a dire metronome

    perhaps one day   we will

    all point back to this isolation

    the aloneness that wrought this line

    or that line into air   and by air

    i mean human hearts   this is a prayer

    for change for life and breath

    for loved ones to recover   to breathe

    without laboring or without thought

    i am reading Auden   cross of the moment

    he does not include in his collected the line

    we must love one another or die the poem

    absent altogether this wind

    isn’t a lie   what seems broken   is

    lies are less expensive

    than anything we have saved  

    here among our hats and buttons  

    gathered then shelved toward what we

    know will always come for us  

    we survive   our ancestors have made it so

    their voices   you hear them too

    they ring of fidelity   live

    endure be    persist return

    breathe yes fill your lungs

    let the wind breathe may dust

    swing from cottonwoods to water

    to meadow   may we be

    lifted from our veils   all of them

    let   too   the broken

    those walking toward home

    in their swollen and inebriated day

    may they   too here in this isolation

    serve as an aspect of truth

    why did he write these lines

    he wrote them in isolation

    in the days where the dead multiplied

    beyond the wars of books and story

    the dead   the dying the swollen

    the broken and the barely breathing

    they are a form of truth   the living

    ache of this place   yes

    the wind too brief breaths

    that fluttered then flew

    as if being alone was a

    breath which formed itself  

    out of our requisite and stored faith

    into song

    This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at emergingform.substack.com/subscribe

    • 35 min
    Episode 21: Craig Childs on life in the pandemic

    Episode 21: Craig Childs on life in the pandemic

    Hula hooping story tellers on street corners? That’s one topic of discussion in this episode of Emerging Form, part of our miniseries on how creatives are responding to the pandemic. We speak with our friend, author and adventurer Craig Childs, whose new book, Virga and Bone: Essays from dry places, is a celebration of the primacy of land. We talk about the pleasures and challenges of staying in one place, postcards to our pre-pandemic selves, what earthquakes have in common with pandemics and also how to place our present predicament in big time--both future and past. We talk about how cultures repeat themselves, how to move forward, and how to welcome what comes. 

    Craig Childs

    Virga and Bone: Essays from Dry Places

    Craig’s postcard to his 2010 self on Last Word on Nothing

    Christie’s postcard to her 2010 self at Last Word On Nothing

    Rosemerry’s poem on resilience 

    Christie's 100-mile habitat project

    Rose Eveleth’s Flash Forward episode: Imagine Better Futures

    This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at emergingform.substack.com/subscribe

    • 35 min
    Episode 20: Creativity and COVID-19 with Tim Green

    Episode 20: Creativity and COVID-19 with Tim Green

    Are there any trends in how the pandemic has affected creative output in America? In this episode of Emerging Form, part of our miniseries on how creatives are responding to the pandemic, we speak with Timothy Green, editor of Rattle, one of America’s most popular poetry magazines. Timothy has worked as editor of Rattle since 2004 and is the author of American Fractal (Red Hen Press), a contributing columnist for the Press-Enterprise newspaper, and co-founder of the Wrighwood Literary Festival. He lives near Los Angeles with his wife, Megan, and their two children.

    In this conversation, we talk about how the stages of grief seems to be showing up in the submissions Rattle is receiving. We also talk about how for creatives, our name is our brand, how administration is also creative act, how Poe’s poem Eureka predated the Big Bang Theory by 70 years, how it feels to be the one writing the rejections, how even editors can get impostor syndrome for editors, and how to trust a process.

    Rattle: www.rattle.com

    Rattle’s YouTube Channel

    Timothy Green

    “Eureka” by Edgar Allen Poe

    American Fractal by Timothy Green, review

    Rosemerry’s poem on missing touch

    Christie’s purple sourdough starter (photo below)

    This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at emergingform.substack.com/subscribe

    • 34 min
    Episode 19: Creativity and COVID-19 with Peter Heller

    Episode 19: Creativity and COVID-19 with Peter Heller

    When life gets difficult, how do we bring our best selves to meet it? That’s one of the questions we ask in this episode of Emerging Form. We continue our miniseries on creativity and COVID-19 by interviewing Peter Heller, author of The Dog Stars, a best-selling post-apocalyptic novel in which the main character has survived a global pandemic. It’s a little close to home--and we talk with Heller about how it feels to have life now mimic his book. We also talk about some of the silver linings of shelter in place, how Heller weaves poetry into his novels, his most recent books The River and The Orchard and what he’s working on now in his Denver writing studio. 

    Heller is the author of seven books. He holds an MFA in poetry and fiction from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, is a former longtime contributor to NPR, and has been a contributing editor at Outside Magazine, Men’s Journal, and National Geographic Adventure.

    Order Peter’s books from your local independent bookstore here.

    This is a public episode. Get access to private episodes at emergingform.substack.com/subscribe

    • 31 min

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5
25 Ratings

25 Ratings

laurajoycedavis ,

A wonderful refuge for creatives in this time of chaos

Christie and Rosemerry do a wonderful job of showcasing the work of other artists in a way that helps us all navigate the disappointments and joys of art and life. Their thoughtful curation of these conversations is a gift to us all, especially in a time when we need to be reminded of the beauty and good in this world. It took a pandemic for me to find them, but I'm so grateful that I did!

SherryBelul ,

Makes me smile ... and think!

I love this podcast! I always feel as if they are sitting in my living room with me, sipping wine and talking about all things creative. I love how these episodes bring me to life. I love how they make me think about new angles on creativity and form. I love the joy and enthusiasm!

KristjanaMama ,

Creative Sparks!

This podcast has quickly become a favorite. Each episode I've listened to has given me an idea and a take-away to spur me on to taking my creative process to a more sustainable level. I could seriously use a dose of these on all of my morning commutes... if only they could become a syndicated radio show on the morning NPR circuit?? :)

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