6 episodes

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside

Farming Today BBC

    • Science

The latest news about food, farming and the countryside

    18/02/20 Flooded livestock, North Shields fishing

    18/02/20 Flooded livestock, North Shields fishing

    Floods continue to cause chaos on farms in South Wales, alongside the Rivers Severn and Wye, and elsewhere too. Today, we hear about the distress of losing livestock and hear what help is available for farmers.

    As part of our week looking at the commercial fishing industry, Jo Lonsdale went to North Shields to meet Nik Hanlon, manager of North Shields Fish Quay.

    Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Beatrice Fenton.

    • 13 min
    18/02/20 Flooded farms, Fishing quotas, Antimicrobial resistance

    18/02/20 Flooded farms, Fishing quotas, Antimicrobial resistance

    Recent storms have left thousands of acres of farmland underwater. Caz Graham talks to a Herefordshire farmer who says that flooding from the River Wye is at record-breaking levels on his farm. He explains the impact this will have on crops for the rest of the year.

    All this week Farming Today is focussing on the fishing industry. Since the introduction of the EU Common Fisheries Policy, quotas have governed what fishing fleets are allowed to catch. So what happens now that the UK has left? Caz talks to a fisheries biologist from York University, who explains how the systems works.

    Essential oil from oregano could become a tool in the fight against antimicrobial resistance. We find out why.

    Presented by Caz Graham and produced by Emma Campbell.

    • 13 min
    17/02/20 Hen harriers, Fishing industry, Fake snail farms

    17/02/20 Hen harriers, Fishing industry, Fake snail farms

    New figures released by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds reveal that birds of prey are being killed or persecuted in greater numbers than ever in England. Data for 2018 shows that it was the worst year in over a decade. What can be done to protect endangered birds of prey? We hear from the RSPB and the Moorland Association.

    Farming Today embarks on a week-long look at the fishing industry. At a time of upheaval and change, what is the future for the UK's fishing fleet?

    How can snails be used as a tax dodge? We find out!

    Presented by Sybil Ruscoe and produced by Emma Campbell.

    • 11 min
    Storing Fresh Produce

    Storing Fresh Produce

    Some of the fresh produce we buy in the supermarket can be nearly a year old. So how do we manage to keep it fresh for so long?

    Sybil Ruscoe visits a root vegetable farm in Shropshire to investigate the science of storage.

    From automatically controlled storage environments to an edible protective coating for fruit - there are all sorts of tricks of the trade, new and old.

    Presented by Sybil Ruscoe
    Produced by Heather Simons

    • 25 min
    14/02/20 New Defra Secretary, Weather, Storing apples

    14/02/20 New Defra Secretary, Weather, Storing apples

    The Prime Minister's cabinet reshuffle has resulted in a new Secretary of State at the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs - the seventh in a decade. Sybil Ruscoe gets reactions to the appointment of George Eustice, the former farming minister, to the top job. What will it mean for both farmers and environmental campaigners?

    Storm Ciara last weekend has left many farmers dealing with flooding, and still unable to get crops into water-logged ground. With another winter storm on the way this weekend, we get advice on how best to cope.

    Farming Today continues its week-long look at technologies which allow fruit and vegetables to be kept fresh for longer, with a visit to an apple grower in Kent.

    Presented by Sybil Ruscoe and produced by Emma Campbell.

    • 13 min
    13/02/20 - Catch App, employing offenders and keeping produce fresh

    13/02/20 - Catch App, employing offenders and keeping produce fresh

    Catch App is a new smart phone app being introduced by the Marine Management Organisation - the Government body which regulates the seas around England. All skippers of England's 2000 fishing boats under ten metres long, are being asked to record the species and weight of fish they catch. The Government says the information will be used to monitor fish stocks and help make fishing sustainable for the future. But fishermen and women say the new recording is complicated and one small mistake could turn them into criminals.

    Access to labour is a perennial problem in farming. Today, we visit a farm in Oxfordshire which has come up with a novel solution. Nettlebed Creamery employs offenders from the nearby HMP Huntercoombe - a Category C prison holding foreign nationals. Prisoners are released on temporary licence each day to work in the creamery, making and packing cheese.

    And this week on Farming Today we're focusing on the science of food storage. Supermarket trials are underway of a sort of protective skin for fruit and veg developed by a US tech company. The plant-based material stops produce going off so quickly and can then be eaten as part of the item!

    Presented by Sybil Ruscoe
    Produced by Heather Simons

    • 13 min

Customer Reviews

101 Reasons Why ,

The Show’s a Gas🗯

What I do is: (1) Reduce my dairy. (2) I’m super-careful with my starches. (3) When matters get particularly whiffy, I’ll pop out to the chemist and swallow a monumental heap of Mrs. Motorboat’s Activated Charcoal. This works, but have patience. (4) In the meantime, for pity’s sake, open a window.👃

tbache9248 ,

Very Educational

I am from the US and really like hearing about problems and solutions. I particularly like to colorful descriptions about the weather, what is being seen, the sounds, wellie boots and all. The recent topic of invasive species was quite interesting. Please keep it up.

Mulligan Hal ,

This is a fun podcast

I listen to this all the time. The stories are interesting, even to someone here in the US. Also helps me understand Britain better.

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