300 episodes

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

The Daily The New York Times

    • Daily News
    • 4.5 • 67.8K Ratings

This is what the news should sound like. The biggest stories of our time, told by the best journalists in the world. Hosted by Michael Barbaro. Twenty minutes a day, five days a week, ready by 6 a.m.

    Special Episode: ‘An Obituary for the Land’

    Special Episode: ‘An Obituary for the Land’

    “Nothing comes easily out here,” Terry Tempest Williams, a Utah-based writer, said of the American West. Her family was once almost taken by fire, and as a child of the West, she grew up with it.

    Our producer Bianca Giaever, who was working out of the West Coast when the wildfires started, woke up one day amid the smoke with the phrase “an obituary to the land” in her head. She called on Ms. Williams, a friend, to write one.

    “I will never write your obituary,” her poem reads. “Because even as you burn, you throw down seeds that will sprout and flower.”

    Guest: Bianca Giaever, a producer for The New York Times, speaks to the writer Terry Tempest Williams.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

    • 10 min
    A Messy Return to School in New York

    A Messy Return to School in New York

    Iolani teaches dual-language kindergarten in Washington Heights in New York City, where she has worked for the last 15 years.

    She, like many colleagues, is leery about a return to in-person instruction amid reports of positive coronavirus cases in other schools. “I go through waves of anxiety and to being hopeful that it works out to just being worried,” she told our producer Lisa Chow.

    On top of mixed messaging from the city about the form teaching could take, her anxiety is compounded by a concern that she might bring the coronavirus home to her daughter, whose immune system is weaker as a result of an organ transplant.

    Today, we look at how one teacher’s concerns in the lead up to the first day back illustrates issues around New York City’s reopening of public schools. 

    Guest: Lisa Chow, a producer for The New York Times, speaks to a kindergarten teacher in New York City.  

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: New York City was scheduled to reopen public schools on Monday. Mayor Bill de Blasio this week delayed the start of in-person instruction.Nearly 40 percent of parents have opted to have their children learn fully remotely through at least the first few months of the school year. That number reflects the deep divide among the city’s families about how to approach in-person learning.

    • 31 min
    The Forgotten Refugee Crisis in Europe

    The Forgotten Refugee Crisis in Europe

    Among the olive groves of Moria, on the Greek island of Lesbos, a makeshift city of tents and containers housed thousands of asylum seekers who had fled conflict and hardship in Africa, the Middle East and elsewhere.

    Already frustrated at the deplorable conditions, inhabitants’ anger was compounded by coronavirus lockdown restrictions. The situation reached a breaking point this month when fires were set, probably by a small group of irate asylum seekers, according to the authorities. The flames decimated the camp and stranded nearly 12,000 of its residents in the wild among tombstones in a nearby cemetery and on rural and coastal roads.

    We chart the European refugee crisis and the events that led up to the blaze at Moria.

    Guest: Matina Stevis-Gridneff, who covers the European Union for The New York Times.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: The fires at the Moria camp have intensified what was already a humanitarian disaster. Originally built to hold 3,000 newly arrived people, it held more than 20,000 refugees six months agoThe camp’s inhabitants had for years resented the squalid conditions and the endless delays in resolving their fates. Those frustrations collided with the restrictions imposed to combat the coronavirus, and the combination has proved explosive.

    • 28 min
    Quarantine on a College Campus

    Quarantine on a College Campus

    This episode contains strong language.

    Infected with the coronavirus and separated from their peers in special dorms, some college students have taken to sharing their quarantine experiences on TikTok.

    In some videos posted to the social media app, food is a source of discontent; one student filmed a disappointing breakfast — warm grape juice, an unripe orange, a “mystery” vegan muffin and an oat bar. Others broach more profound issues like missed deliveries of food and supplie.

    It was within this TikTok community that Natasha Singer, our business technology reporter, found 19-year-old Zoie Terry, a sophomore at the University of Alabama, who was one of the first students to be sequestered at her college’s isolation facility.

    Today, we speak to Ms. Terry about her experience and explore what it tells us about the reopening of colleges. 

    Guest: Natasha Singer, a technology reporter for The New York Times, spoke with Zoie Terry, a sophomore at the University of Alabama. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Across America, colleges that have reopened for in-person teaching are struggling to contain the spread of the coronavirus. To this end, the institutions are using one of the oldest infection control measures: quarantine.While universities in other states were closing their doors, the University of Alabama opened up to students, banking on its testing and technology program to prevent an outbreak.

    • 31 min
    A Deadly Tinderbox

    A Deadly Tinderbox

    “The entire state is burning.” That was the refrain Jack Healy, our national correspondent, kept hearing when he arrived in the fire zone in Oregon.

    The scale of the wildfires is dizzying — millions of acres have burned, 30 different blazes are raging and thousands of people have been displaced.

    Dry conditions, exacerbated by climate change and combined with a windstorm, created the deadly tinderbox.

    The disaster has proved a fertile ground for misinformation: Widely discredited rumors spread on social media claiming that antifa activists were setting fires and looting.

    Today, we hear from people living in the fire’s path who told Jack about the toll the flames had exacted.

    Guest: Jack Healy, a national correspondent for The New York Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading:“The long-term recovery is going to last years,” an emergency management director said as the fires left a humanitarian disaster in their wake.The fearmongering and false rumors that accompanied a tumultuous summer of protests in Oregon have become a volatile complication in the disaster.

    • 27 min
    Inside Trump’s Immigration Crackdown

    Inside Trump’s Immigration Crackdown

    This episode contains strong language.

    After Donald Trump was elected president, two filmmakers were granted rare access to the operations of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Since Mr. Trump had campaigned on a hard-line immigration agenda, the leaders of the usually secretive agency jumped at a chance to have their story told from the inside. Today, we speak to the filmmakers about what they saw during nearly three years at ICE and how the Trump administration reacted to a cut of the film.

    Guests: Christina Clusiau and Shaul Schwarz, the filmmakers behind the six-hour documentary series “Immigration Nation.”

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: The Trump administration has threatened the two filmmakers with legal action and fought to delay the release of “Immigration Nation” until after the election.

    • 25 min

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5
67.8K Ratings

67.8K Ratings

Dusty shell ,

Well done

I Love the fact itGoes into detail in one topic but then adds a short list of the major stuff that’s going on. I also really like barbaros questions.He asks common sense questionsThat help us understand what is going on.

ofranco ,

Where is Michael ?

Wondering where is Michael ?

adoug867 ,

Great journalism but please diversify topics

Love this podcast so much when you talk about a host of topics that are unrelated to politics. I understand politics is something you have to cover from time to time but we see it everywhere... all the time!

Any chance we can hear more of your great reporting on other topics more often? Thank you for all that you do.

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