5 episodes

The results of the 2016 election came as a shock to many Americans on both sides of the political spectrum. The events that followed have only deepened the sense of two Americas that don’t understand each other. The result, as 2020 gets underway and Democrats choose their nominee, is an electorate anxious that it no longer knows what makes for a winning candidate — an electorate asking itself which candidate *other* people might be willing to vote for, not necessarily which candidate they themselves most want to see in office. Each week, Times political reporters will travel around the country speaking with voters to understand their hopes and fears in the lead-up to an election in which the stakes have never felt higher to either side.

The Field The New York Times

    • Daily News

The results of the 2016 election came as a shock to many Americans on both sides of the political spectrum. The events that followed have only deepened the sense of two Americas that don’t understand each other. The result, as 2020 gets underway and Democrats choose their nominee, is an electorate anxious that it no longer knows what makes for a winning candidate — an electorate asking itself which candidate *other* people might be willing to vote for, not necessarily which candidate they themselves most want to see in office. Each week, Times political reporters will travel around the country speaking with voters to understand their hopes and fears in the lead-up to an election in which the stakes have never felt higher to either side.

    Biden’s Last Hope

    Biden’s Last Hope

    Former vice president Joseph R. Biden Jr. was once a clear front-runner in the race for the Democratic nomination. Now, he is fighting back from a string of losses and staking his candidacy on his ability to win tomorrow’s South Carolina primary, the first in a state with a large black population. But will he win, and if the margin isn’t as decisive as he hopes, can he stay in the race? Guest: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times traveled to South Carolina with Clare Toeniskoetter and Annie Brown, producers on “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: A new poll showed Mr. Biden with a wide lead in South Carolina, with Senator Bernie Sanders and hedge fund billionaire Tom Steyer trailing behind.Mr. Biden lashed out after reports that Mr, Sanders considered mounting a primary challenge to President Barack Obama in 2012, saying it was “one of the reasons I resent Bernie.”Churches have long played the primary role in mobilizing black support in South Carolina. So how are candidates faring among congregations?

    • 34 min
    An Anti-Endorsement in Nevada

    An Anti-Endorsement in Nevada

    Note: This episode contains strong language.

    Senator Bernie Sanders is a staunchly pro-union candidate. But he has found himself mired in an escalating battle over health care with the largest labor union in Nevada. With what some call “the best insurance in America” — the fruit of struggles including a six-year strike — members of the Culinary Workers Union have been reluctant to support Mr. Sanders’s “Medicare for All” plan. We went to Nevada to ask how what is effectively an anti-endorsement of Mr. Sanders from the union’s leaders may affect his support in the state’s caucuses on Saturday.

    Guests: Jennifer Medina, who is covering the 2020 presidential campaign for The Times traveled to Nevada with Clare Toeniskoetter and Austin Mitchell, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: Mr. Sanders, who is betting on the Latino vote to win the nomination, is trying to convince Nevada’s union members his policies are in their best interest. His rivals are trying to capitalize on the fight.The Nevada Democratic Party has been scrambling to put in effect safeguards in its caucuses to avoid the technical issues that created a debacle in Iowa. Here’s how the caucuses will work.

    • 41 min
    The Aftershocks of Iowa in New Hampshire

    The Aftershocks of Iowa in New Hampshire

    Voters in New Hampshire pride themselves on helping winnow the nomination field. While many polls show Senator Bernie Sanders leading in this year’s primary, the caucus debacle in Iowa meant no single candidate left that first contest with full momentum. We flew from Iowa to New Hampshire, following the campaign trail and talking to voters about whether Democrats who don’t support Sanders are coalescing around another choice.

    Guests: Lisa Lerer, a reporter at The New York Times, covering campaigns, elections and political power, and Clare Toeniskoetter and Jessica Cheung, producers on “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: Mr. Sanders and Mayor Pete Buttigieg, of South Bend, Ind., are hoping to make the race for the nomination a two-person contest.Still, after a voting fiasco in Iowa, it’s possible that five leading candidates will survive beyond New Hampshire.President Trump is coming to New Hampshire, too: He’s scheduled to hold a campaign rally in Manchester tonight and will be on the Republican ballot Tuesday. Here are the latest updates from the state’s last day of primary campaigning.

    • 30 min
    Iowa’s Electability Complex

    Iowa’s Electability Complex

    With Iowa voters making their choice and the 2020 election getting underway, we’re introducing a new show: one covering the country and its voters in the lead up to Nov. 3. In our first episode of “The Field,” we ask Democratic caucusgoers how they’re feeling about the election. Traveling around the state, we found anxious Iowans asking one question over and over: Who can beat President Trump? Note: This episode contains strong language.

    Guests: Astead W. Herndon, who covers national politics for The New York Times, and Austin Mitchell and Andy Mills, producers for “The Daily.” For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: Confused by the Iowa caucuses? Here’s how they work.The New York Times polled 584 Democrats likely to caucus in Iowa. Fifteen of them agreed to talk to us on camera. Here is what they told us.The state with a huge influence in picking presidential candidates doesn’t look much like the country as a whole, except in one very striking way: a rapidly aging population.

    • 37 min
    The Lessons of 2016

    The Lessons of 2016

    The media’s coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign has come to be criticized for operating under three key assumptions: that Hillary Clinton was certain to be the Democratic nominee, that Donald Trump was unlikely to be the Republican nominee, and that once Clinton and Trump had become their party’s nominees, she would win.

    With voting for 2020 set to begin in Iowa on Monday, “The Daily” sat down with Dean Baquet, the executive editor of The New York Times, to discuss the lessons he — and the organization — learned from 2016. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily. 

    Background reading: This is our guide to the 2020 election.We’ve sent reporters to every corner of the country and told them not to make any assumptions in this election cycle. Here are some of the most in-depth stories we’ve told in an effort to help the country understand itself.As part of a new approach to election coverage, The Times’s editorial board has re-examined how — and why — it makes presidential endorsements.

    • 52 min

Customer Reviews

cate2289 ,

Love

Love the coverage over a wider swath of America. I think it’ll really help me contextualize events.

Beth84749 ,

the well manicured field

Subscribed because I was told I would hear from the voices that NYT and other media left out in 2016. Three episodes in and it’s the same ole NYT narrative. My god. Not sure if I was deceived or NYT is just that incapable of getting out of its own brain and letting the story be told. And no, I’m not a Bernie bro. I’m not a trumper. I just find it’s better to indulge in audio reporting that doesn’t feel it needs to hijack the narrative with carefully chosen talking points behind the backs of the people you say you are trying to give a voice to.

drowninginflame ,

I’m done with it!

Two episodes in, and I can’t even finish the second one! I’m so disgusted...

The first episode’s notes made it seem like they were going to focus on ‘undecided’ voters in Iowa, but halfway through the episode it turned into a Buttigieg commercial!

Giving the second episode the benefit of doubt, less than 10 minutes in and they’re already at a Buttigieg rally!

Buttigieg will never be POTUS...he has no path to beat Trump. I’m done. This podcast is obviously biased...nothing new from the NYT.

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