16 episodes

This is The Field, a series that goes inside towns and cities across America in the lead-up to the 2020 presidential election. Each week, Times reporters will speak to voters to understand their hopes and fears at a time when the stakes have never felt higher on either side.

The Field The New York Times

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    • 4.2 • 127 Ratings

This is The Field, a series that goes inside towns and cities across America in the lead-up to the 2020 presidential election. Each week, Times reporters will speak to voters to understand their hopes and fears at a time when the stakes have never felt higher on either side.

    Georgia Runoffs, Part 2: ‘I Have Zero Confidence In My Vote’

    Georgia Runoffs, Part 2: ‘I Have Zero Confidence In My Vote’

    Since the presidential election was called for Joseph R. Biden Hr., President Trump has relentlessly attacked the integrity of the count in Georgia. He has floated conspiracy theories to explain away his loss and attacked Republican officials.

    The resulting fault lines in the party before a close Georgia Senate runoff vote have caused concern that the cynicism toward the electoral system could translate into suppressed Republican turnout.
    Today, we speak to Republican activists and voters on the ground and consider to what extent, if at all, Mr. Trump’s rhetoric could discourage Republicans from voting

    For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter.

    Background reading:

    Senators Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue have sought to motivate a conservative base that remains loyal to Mr. Trump while also luring back some of the defectors who helped deliver Georgia to a Democratic presidential candidate for the first time since 1992.

    Democrats may have claimed a bigger share of the early vote than they did in November’s vote, election data shows. Here’s what else we know about the voting in Georgia so far.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

    • 44 min
    The Georgia Runoffs, Part 1: ‘We Are Black Diamonds.’

    The Georgia Runoffs, Part 1: ‘We Are Black Diamonds.’

    A strong Black turnout will be integral to Democratic success in the U.S. Senate races in Georgia this week.
    In the first of a two-part examination of election strategies in the Georgia runoffs, we sit down with Stacey Abrams, a Georgia Democrat who has become synonymous with the party’s attempts to win statewide, to talk about her efforts to mobilize Black voters.
    And we join LaTosha Brown, a leader of Black Voters Matter, as she heads out to speak to voters.

    Guest: Audra D.S. Burch, a national correspondent for The New York Times.

    For an exclusive look at how the biggest stories on our show come together, subscribe to our newsletter.

    Background reading:
    Control of the Senate could hinge on Black voters in Georgia — and on an ambitious effort by the likes of Black Voters Matter to get them to the polls in the largest numbers ever for the runoff elections on Tuesday.
    Democrats are making their final push to rally supporters, targeting Black voters in regions far from Atlanta but equally important to Georgia’s emerging Democratic coalition.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily

    • 41 min
    On Election Day, 'Two Different Worlds'

    On Election Day, 'Two Different Worlds'

    This episode contains strong language.

    At the heart of one race for the Wisconsin State Assembly are some of the same political cracks splitting the U.S. as a whole. Some believe keeping businesses running is a priority during the coronavirus pandemic; others think keeping people safe and healthy should be given precedence.

    Rob Swearingen is a four-time Republican assemblyman and owner of a local restaurant. He challenged the lockdown imposed by Wisconsin’s governor and, since reopening his business, has taken a loose interpretation of the mask mandate.

    His Democratic challenger, Kirk Bangstad, has strictly followed statewide edicts, opening his restaurant outdoors in the summer and, when there were coronavirus infections among his staff, closing down until all could be tested.

    What do the different approaches reveal about Wisconsin politics and about broader American divisions? Reid J. Epstein, a politics reporter for The New York Times, and Andy Mills and Luke Vander Ploeg, audio producers for The Times, went to the state to find out.

    Guests: Reid J. Epstein, who covers campaigns and elections for The New York Times; Andy Mills, a senior audio producer for The Times; Luke Vander Ploeg, an audio producer for The Times. 




    Bonus Election Day special: The Daily is going LIVE today. Listen to Michael Barbaro and Carolyn Ryan, a deputy managing editor at The Times, as they call our correspondents for the latest on a history-making day. 

    Tune in from 4 - 8 p.m. Eastern, only on nytimes.com/thedaily and on the The New York Times iPhone app. Click here for more information. 




    Background reading: Here’s Reid’s story about how the virus has divided the conservative town of Minocqua, Wis.President Trump and Joe Biden barnstormed through battleground states, concluding an extraordinary campaign conducted amid a health crisis and deep economic anxiety.

    • 37 min
    The Shy Biden Voters Among Florida’s Seniors

    The Shy Biden Voters Among Florida’s Seniors

    Florida’s seniors played an important role in President Trump’s victory there in 2016. Older voters, who are mostly conservative, make up around 25 percent of the swing state’s electorate and turn out in astonishing numbers.

    They are also disproportionately affected by the pandemic, and polling suggests that Joe Biden is making inroads with Republican-leaning older voters.

    In Florida’s conservative retirement communities, however, the decision to switch from Mr. Trump can have consequences and many stay quiet for fear of reprisals.

    Some of these consequences are obvious: One resident who erected a sign in support of Mr. Biden woke up to “Trump” written in weedkiller on his lawn. Other effects are more personal, and more insidious.

    Today, Annie Brown, a senior audio producer at The Times, speaks to some of Florida’s seniors about their voting intentions — including one, Dave Niederkorn, who has turned his back on Mr. Trump and almost lost a close friend in the process.

    Guests: Annie Brown, a senior audio producer for The New York Times; and Patricia Mazzei, the Miami bureau chief of The Times, who covers Florida and Puerto Rico. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Older people are a crucial voting bloc in Florida. In a speech earlier this month, Joe Biden made his pitch to them.“If it’s here, it’s here” — how retirees in Florida’s Villages confronted the coronavirus in the summer. 

    • 37 min
    The Specter of Political Violence

    The Specter of Political Violence

    This episode contains strong language.

    With an election in which uncertainty may abound, concerns are swirling around the possibility of political violence. Experts and officials — including those charged with the security of polling stations and ballot counting facilities — have been taking extra precautions.

    Americans across the political spectrum appear to be preparing themselves for this possibility, too: Eight of the 10 biggest weeks for gun sales since the late 1990s took place since March this year. Many of those sales were to people buying guns for the first time.

    Today’s episode examines these anxieties from two perspectives.

    Andy Mills, a senior audio producer for The New York Times, speaks to patrons of gun stores in Washington State about their motivations and sits down with a first-time gun owner who relays his anxiety, ignited by the unrest and protests in Seattle over the summer.

    And Alix Spiegel, a senior audio editor for The Times, visits three women of color in North Carolina, one of whom says the scenes in Charlottesville, the killing of Black people at the hands of the police and the threat of white militias have encouraged her to shift her anti-gun stance. 

    Guests:  Andy Mills, a senior audio producer for The New York Times; Alix Spiegel, a senior audio editor for The Times; and Reid J. Epstein, who covers campaigns and elections for The Times. 

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: Gun buyers say they are motivated by a new sense of instability that is pushing them to purchase weapons for the first time, or if they already have them, to buy more.

    • 47 min
    Why Suburban Women Changed Their Minds

    Why Suburban Women Changed Their Minds

    In America’s increasingly divided political landscape, it can be hard to imagine almost any voter switching sides. One demographic group has provided plenty of exceptions: white suburban women.

    In the past four years, the group has turned away from the president in astonishing numbers. And many of them are organizing — Red, Wine and Blue is a group made up of suburban women from Ohio hoping to swing the election for Joe Biden. The organization draws on women who voted for the president and third parties in 2016, as well as existing Democratic voters.

    In today’s episode, Lisa Lerer, who covers campaigns, elections and political power for The New York Times, speaks to white suburban women on the ground in Ohio and explores their shifting allegiances and values.

    Guest: Lisa Lerer, a reporter for The New York Times covering campaigns, elections and political power.

    For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily 

    Background reading: The white suburban voters the president needs to carve a path to victory have turned away from him, often for deeply personal reasons.

    • 34 min

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5
127 Ratings

127 Ratings

Pbskidtheone ,

Villages Democrats

Why didn’t you interview the man leading the Dem support in The Villages? His name is Ed McGinty. There have been other supporters as well.

realcheddabob ,

💙

I love everything about this podcast

cate2289 ,

Love

Love the coverage over a wider swath of America. I think it’ll really help me contextualize events.

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