EP 1054B - New Study Examines How Breast Implant Surfaces Affect Immune System YOU The Owners Manual Radio Show

    • Alternative Health

Rice University bioengineers collaborated on a six-year study that systematically analyzed how the surface architecture of breast implants influences the development of adverse effects, including an unusual type of lymphoma. Rice University bioengineers collaborated on a six-year study that systematically analyzed how the surface architecture of breast implants influences the development of adverse effects, including an unusual type of lymphoma. Every year, about 400,000 people receive silicone breast implants in the United States. According to FDA data, most of those implants need to be replaced within 10 years due to the buildup of scar tissue and other complications. Omid Veiseh, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Rice who began the research six years ago during a postdoctoral fellowship at MIT. His lab focuses on developing and studying biocompatible materials, said he is particularly excited about the discovery that surface architecture can be tuned to reduce host immune responses and fibrosis to breast implants. He joins us to talk more about these findings.  Want better health and nutrition? Now you can get personalized supplement recommendations and custom vitamin packs delivered to your door! Go to PersonaNutrition.com/Roizen and take your free assessment and get 50% off your order today. - sponsor   Bonus How Your Diet Affects Your Risk for Cancer

Rice University bioengineers collaborated on a six-year study that systematically analyzed how the surface architecture of breast implants influences the development of adverse effects, including an unusual type of lymphoma. Rice University bioengineers collaborated on a six-year study that systematically analyzed how the surface architecture of breast implants influences the development of adverse effects, including an unusual type of lymphoma. Every year, about 400,000 people receive silicone breast implants in the United States. According to FDA data, most of those implants need to be replaced within 10 years due to the buildup of scar tissue and other complications. Omid Veiseh, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Rice who began the research six years ago during a postdoctoral fellowship at MIT. His lab focuses on developing and studying biocompatible materials, said he is particularly excited about the discovery that surface architecture can be tuned to reduce host immune responses and fibrosis to breast implants. He joins us to talk more about these findings.  Want better health and nutrition? Now you can get personalized supplement recommendations and custom vitamin packs delivered to your door! Go to PersonaNutrition.com/Roizen and take your free assessment and get 50% off your order today. - sponsor   Bonus How Your Diet Affects Your Risk for Cancer

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